salt glaze

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salt glaze

[′sȯlt ‚glāz]
(engineering)
Glaze formed on the surface of stoneware by putting salt into the kiln during firing.
References in periodicals archive ?
Regrettably there was little information on the actual salt glazing process.
As was observed by the author: "High-temperature soda glazing had its origin in the 1970s, when there were attempts to find less-polluting, chloride-free alternatives to salt glazing.
A brief history of salt glazing: Salt glazing dates back to the 15th century.
In my opinion, the large scale production somehow blocked a more risky type of experimentation with the use of salt glazing.
Up to the 20th century there was no tradition of salt glazing in Denmark.
In 1989 I established a salt kiln at the School of Arts and Crafts in Kolding, Denmark and taught the techniques of salt glazing for a possible third generation of 'salters'.
Here you can watch the traditional techniques of hand moulding, hand throwing & casting and specialised salt glazing.
An interest in copper reds and celadons produced a few years of genteel poverty and then in 1980 he built a woodfired salt glazing kiln.
North-East company Errington Reay, established in 1878, uses traditional methods of hand throwing, moulding, casting and specialised salt glazing and firing techniques which result in an unusual textured finish with a warm, umber glow.
Reitz loved salt glazing because it creates a thin, subtly textured surface that enhances the gestural quality of the marks (he) made in wet clay.
The situation of Goldsmiths in a densely populated area of London together with concerns around environmental pollution prevented her experiments with salt glazing but encouraged her to seek out other means of achieving the surfaces she was tying to create.