salt lick

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salt lick

1. a place where wild animals go to lick naturally occurring salt deposits
2. a block of salt or a salt preparation given to domestic animals to lick
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: The big bongo was hitting this salt lick every few days and had been captured by trail cam.
Jason Isaac, R-Dripping Springs - whose district includes the Salt Lick - was one of about two dozen House members who opposed the limits on craft breweries.
In areas of the country which have snowy roads in the winter, salt licks can actually save not only the lives of animals but human ones too!
Unlike deep geologic repositories made of sometimes-brittle shale and granite, salt licks aren't prone to fracturing under stress, which could allow radioactivity from buried waste to seep into groundwater and the surrounding environment.
"Those who work the salt mines are trained engineers who keep the machinery running - a far cry from the pickaxes and buckets used in the mines'' early days in the 1800s, when rock salt was primarily used for salt licks - blocks of salt - for animals."
Peth arall fyddai Mr Davies yn ei werthu oedd 'salt licks' i'w rhoi yn sownd o flaen buchod neu'n rhydd yng nghafnau'r gwartheg.
In New Hampshire, 3 times as many encounters between people and moose occurred at night than in daytime at roadside salt licks (Silverberg et al.
Males and females preferred artificial salt licks in the summer, while females preferred artificial mineral licks in the spring (Atwood and Weeks, 2003).
Contrasting the data with information compiled in growth charts, the company began developing nutritional supplements, mostly in the form of salt licks, which the animals consume in addition to the grass.
Expeditions were sent out in search of salt licks, places where animals found natural deposits of salt.
Also, congregations at salt licks are important in the social lives of elephants and seasonal movements in Wankie National Park, Zimbabwe, were based on the distribution of slat-rich water holes (Wier 1972).