Salvator Rosa


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Salvator Rosa:

see Rosa, SalvatorRosa, Salvator
, 1615–73, Italian baroque painter, etcher, and poet of the Neapolitan school. In 1635, Rosa went to Rome, where he established his reputation with his painting Prometheus (Corsini Palace, Rome). He satirized the great Roman sculptor and architect G.
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.

Rosa, Salvator

(sälvätōr` rô`zä), 1615–73, Italian baroque painter, etcher, and poet of the Neapolitan school. In 1635, Rosa went to Rome, where he established his reputation with his painting Prometheus (Corsini Palace, Rome). He satirized the great Roman sculptor and architect G. L. BerniniBernini, Giovanni Lorenzo or Gianlorenzo
, 1598–1680, Italian sculptor and architect, b. Naples. He was the dominant figure of the Italian baroque.
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 and moved to Florence in 1640 to avoid Bernini's wrath and to work for the Medici family, painting, writing poems and satires, composing music, and acting. He returned permanently to Rome in 1649. Rosa is best known for his spirited battle pieces painted in the style of Falcone, for his marines, and especially for his landscapes. His large historical works are considered less successful. His landscapes are usually desolate scenes, painted in a tempestuous manner. His works are in many major European museums; a self-portrait is in the Metropolitan Museum. He began etching in 1660 and produced over 100 fine plates. Several of his satiric poems are well known.

Bibliography

See E. W. Manwaring, Italian Landscape (1925, repr. 1965).

Rosa, Salvator

 

Born June 20 or July 21, 1615, in Arenel-la, Campania; died Mar. 15, 1673, in Rome. Italian painter, engraver, and poet.

Rosa worked in Naples, Florence, and Rome. His art, which contained a distinctive romantic protest against existing social norms, opposed the academic direction of the Italian baroque. Many of his paintings and etchings are devoted to religious and mythological themes, for example, Astraea Bids Farewell to the Peasants (Historical Museum of Art, Vienna). Particularly well known are Rosa’s scenes of cavalry skirmishes and views of wild coastal regions. The artist’s works are distinguished by sharp contrasts of light and shadow. Rosa employed free brush-strokes and favored a gloomy leaden brown palette.

In his poetry, which included seven satires written in terza rima, Rosa used complex allegories and whimsically dramatic images, which caustically ridiculed contemporary trends in Italian literature and castigated the vices of the ruling classes. In the satire War the author sympathetically described the anti-feudal uprising in Naples of the urban lower classes led by Ma-saniello.

REFERENCES

Sal’vator Roza: 1615–73. (Album. Preface by T. Znamerovskaia.) Moscow, 1972.
Limentani, U. Bibliographia delta vita e delle opere di Salvator Rosa. [Florence, 1955.]
Carbone, A. Salvator Rosa: Vita ed opera. Naples, 1968.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chantilly, near Paris, has several Salvator Rosas, and is well worth a special excursion.
It is these legends that gave rise to such romantic works of fiction as Alexandre Dumas pere's novella Salvator Rosa: moeurs napolitaines (1843) and Ferdinand Dugue's drama Salvator Rosa (1851).
In this way, Turner paid tribute to Salvator Rosa, but also asserted himself as a poetic British painter, depicting Britain's history and landscape.
DRAMATIC LIGHTING: Self portrait by Salvator Rosa (1615-73), 1641, oil on canvas
Ruisdael was not one of the group of Dutch artists who wandered south to Rome and stayed there until they came to be resented by such local artists as Salvator Rosa.
Salvator Rosa (1615-1673) Head of a Man with a Turban (1650s).
Bored, he managed to escape and took lessons from the drawing master Boniface Musso, who showed him engravings of works by the 17th-century painter 'savage' Salvator Rosa, in whose hands landscape became eloquent of dark, tempestuous emotion.
They are The Virgin with the Child Piercing the Head of the Serpent by Giovanni Battista Gaulli (known as Baciccio), Mercury and Argus by Pier Francesco Mola, Head of a Man with a Turban by Salvator Rosa, A Franciscan Monk Distributing Food to Peasants attributed to Pieter van Laer and Faith, Hope and Charity by the studio of Franceso Albani.
1530) by Sebastiano del Piombo face a group of paintings of philosophers by Jusepe de Ribera, Luca Giordano, Salvator Rosa and Johann Moreelse, the short-lived son of the more famous Paul.
At that time in 18th-century Ireland, the techniques and subjects of Claude, Poussin and Salvator Rosa appealed to artists and collectors alike.