Salvian

(redirected from Salvianus)

Salvian

(săl`vēən), fl. 5th cent., Christian writer of Gaul. His Latin name was Salvianus. He was a monk and priest of Lérins (from c.424) and became a renowned preacher and teacher of rhetoric. Of his several works two treatises and nine letters are extant. De gubernatione Dei [on the governance of God] is in eight books, of which the first five are Salvian's. Incomplete as it is, it is a moving indictment of contemporary Roman and Gallic society and a call to true Christian living. The other work, usually called Contra avaritiam [against avarice], is a plea for generosity to the Church.

Bibliography

See tr. by E. M. Sanford (1930) and J. F. O'Sullivan (1947).

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The writers of the Church Tertullian and Salvianus are fully convinced of the fact that, since the beginning of time, the human race has been ungrateful to God.
Salvianus of Marseilles and the Fifth-Century Crisis: Historical-Theological Aspects of the De Gubernatione Dei
We only have the names of two African equestrian commanders, Aemilius Salvianus and Minthonius Tartullus, but there were many more!
Baxter was persuaded from his study of Scripture that parish ministers were endowed with episcopal authority with respect to discipline, a view that formed the biblical foundation of his arguments in Gildas Salvianus. (51) While the fall of prelatical episcopacy theoretically allowed the power of the keys to revert to local pastors, the failure to enforce the Westminster Assembly's substitute settlement confronted clergy like Baxter with the unprecedented absence of any guiding structure for local discipline.
(51.) Baxter, Gildas Salvianus; The Reformed Pastor (1656), 9, 10, 13.
For Catechizing or Personal Instructing (1656); Baxter, Gildas Salvianus; The Reformed Pastor (1656); Baxter, Universal Concord (1660), 34-35; Reliquiae Baxterianae, 1: [section] 135, 83; 1: [section] 136, 85; also 2: [section] 40-42, 179-180.