Samanids

Samanids

 

a feudal dynasty in Middle Asia; ruled from A.D. 819 to 999. The name of the dynasty is derived from Saman-khuda, who came from the village of Saman near Balkh in northern Afghanistan. The sons and grandsons of Saman, for their help in suppressing the anti-Arab rebellion of Rafi ibn Leis (806–810), received the right to govern the most important areas of Mavera-un-Nahr. The Samanid dynasty came to an end with Mansur II (997–999), after the Turkic tribes took Bukhara in 999.

References in periodicals archive ?
The Samanids had Tajik-Aryan affiliation and were sympathetic to preserving the Aryan heritage.
Bokhara's chequered history saw the golden age of the Samanids in the ninth and 10th centuries, and its recovery from the 13th century onslaught of Genghis Khan's hordes, to once again become a religious hub for the region in the 16th century, with rich patrons sponsoring hundreds of exquisitely built mosques and madressahs.
Album, (2) 1998), 68-71, 82-83; for the Samanids, M.
Al-Jayhani was a geographer at the court of the Samanids in the 10th century and whose work includes a chapter on the Magyars, a nomadic pagan tribe that lived on the Eurasian steppe and were the ancestors of Christian Hungarians.
samanids (819999) was a sunni Muslim ruling dynasty in Central Asian region.
At the beginning of the Sasanian style common in the art of metalworking, but later was incorporated Islamic style using themes and archaism of the Sasanian period before the period Buwayhid and Samanids in Iran, under ordinary Iranians.
In the 10th century, Muslim rulers called Samanids, from Bukhara (in what is now Uzbekistan), extended their influence into Afghanistan, and the complete conversion of Afghanistan to Islam occurred during the rule of the Gaznavids in the 11th century.
Al-Maturidi was able to flourish "under the powerful rule of the Samanids, who ruled practically the whole of Persia from 261/874 to 389/999 actively patronized science and literature, and gathered around their Court a number of renowned scholars.
Allan, a senior scholar in the history of Islamic architecture, offers a significant addition to the scholarship with this beautifully illustrated, authoritative excursus on the monuments and defining features and styles of Shi'a art and architecture, surveying the development of the style and the history and use of specific monuments from the Samanids to the present day.
Ferdowsi would live to see the Samanids conquered by the Ghaznavid Turks.
During their reign, the Samanids supported the revival of the written Persian language in the wake of the Arab Islamic conquest in the early 8th century and played an important role in preserving the culture of the pre-Islamic Persian-speaking world.
Against these views, he develops a very comprehensive comparative method claiming that rather than the Byzantines, Ottoman institutions had emerged from the Turco-Islamic heritage beginning on one side from the Sassanids, Abbasids, Samanids, Great Seljuks and Seljuks of Rum and on the other side from the pre-Islamic Turkish heritage (Koprulu, 2003).