Samsun

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Samsun

(sämso͞on`), city (1990 pop. 301,412), capital of Samsun prov., N Turkey, on the Black Sea. The most important Turkish port on the Black Sea, it is also a major tobacco-processing center and an agricultural market. Textiles, tobacco, and fertilizer are exported. The ancient Amisus, it was founded (6th cent. B.C.) by Greek colonists, became an important city of the kingdom of Pontus, and was much favored under the Roman Empire. In the Middle Ages it was held by the Byzantines, the Seljuk Turks, the Genoese, and the empire of Trebizond before falling (14th cent.) to the Ottoman Turks. On May 19, 1919, Kemal Atatürk landed at Samsun to organize a nationalist movement in Turkey. A statue commemorates this event.

Samsun

 

a city in northern Turkey and administrative center of Samsun Vilayet. Population, 134,300(1970).

Samsun is a port on Samsun Bay of the Black Sea; freight turnover was 1.5 million tons in 1973. Tobacco, grain, wool, and fruit are shipped out through the port. The city is a railroad and highway junction, and it has an airport. Samsun is the center of a large tobacco-growing region; it is a distribution center for imported goods. Industry includes tobacco, food, chemicals, production of mineral fertilizers, and fishing. Samsun was founded in the sixth century B.C. and was originally called Amisus.

Samsun

a port in N Turkey, on the Black Sea. Pop.: 395 000 (2005 est.)
References in periodicals archive ?
glutinosa chromosome in Holmes Samsoun to estimate the relative amounts of N.
Aberrant segregation of TMV resistance in progeny derived from crosses with the chromosome substitution line, Holmes Samsoun, agreed with previously reported observations (Gerstel, 1945).
Gerstel (1945) found the N-carrying chromosome of Holmes Samsoun to be transmitted through the egg only 19.
All accessions possessed a small fraction of the markers that were present in the line Holmes Samsoun.
glutinosa marker present in Holmes Samsoun and that segregates independently of the N-carrying chromosome in this accession.
The derivation of the accessions evaluated in this research and their possible relationship to Holmes Samsoun is not known.