San Juan Hill


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San Juan Hill

(săn wän, Span. sän hwän), Oriente prov., E Cuba, near the city of Santiago de Cuba. It was the scene (July, 1898) of a battle in the Spanish-American War, in which Theodore Roosevelt and the Rough Riders took part.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In his "crowded hour" during the Rough Riders' charge up Kettle Hill toward the blockhouse on San Juan Hill, Lt.
(10) The fair took place in September of 1898, only a month after the end of the war and only about two months after the Battle of San Juan Hill, the event that was to shape Roosevelt's image for the rest of his life.
The battle of San Juan Hill may have done more to promote the development of the 1903 Springfield than any other single event in history, and to think we ended up paying Mauser a royalty for privilege of making the "Springfield Mausers."
Bully Composition lives on that fulcrum of "just before or just after." As part of his methods, the photographer character explains, "I can get myself into a sort of trance, really transport myself to a different time or place, and it seems to be helpful, picture-taking-wise." To illustrate, the photographer gazes up into a beam of light and leaps into the moment as "Sergeant Edward Thomas; Sterling, Indiana; H Troop." He recounts in vivid detail the carnage of San Juan Hill: "Mullen lost his eye and he's crying out of the other one.
Coffman also succeeds in brilliantly evoking the quotidian experience of army life in the period between San Juan Hill and Pearl Harbor.
"In essence, he tells the story of San Juan Hill rather than having Roosevelt do it.
Of the legendary charge of Roosevelt and his Rough Riders up San Juan Hill, a friend wrote, "No hunting trip so far has ever equaled it in Theodore's eyes." Madison's analysis as he worked on the Constitution remains brilliant in today's reading.
Just beyond that ridge was San Juan Hill. From there, the Spanish controlled the crucial harbor at Santiago.
After the battle of San Juan Hill [in the Spanish-American War], the Americans found a dead man with a light complexion, red hair and blue eyes.
This was the kind of store that Teddy Roosevelt shopped -- he probably did, for all I know -- before he charged up San Juan Hill. Hemingway would have gone here -- and odds are did -- in preparation for the snows of Kilimanjaro or the bulls of Pamplona.
Teddy Roosevelt's charge up San Juan Hill symbolized the coming of age of the United States as an international power.
(1.) I'm using the term African American city to refer to those specific areas of cities that have been historically the centers of African American residency and culture-for instance, New York City's Harlem and certain areas of Brooklyn (and Manhattan's San Juan Hill and Little Africa before them), Los Angeles' Central Avenue district and Watts, and Chicago's South Side.

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