Sanballat


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Sanballat

(sănbăl`ət), in the Bible, one of the Persian officials in Palestine who consistently opposed Nehemiah in his restoration of Jerusalem. He is called a Horonite, a designation perhaps from the name Bethhoron.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Gerizim, since the time of Sanballat in 450 BC or earlier.
Subsequent to his excavations at Tell Al-Ras, Bull and Wright (1965: 234-237) reported the finding of remains of a Samaritan temple, built to the same plan as the Jerusalem Temple in the time of Sanballat, governor of Samaria (Temple b), beneath the Roman temple.
Resumiendo un poco las informaciones conservadas podemos atestiguar intercambios de cartas de los judios de Elefantina con los satrapas de Samaria descendientes de Sanballat (27), con el regente en la provincia persa de Yehud y con el satrapa egipcio, asi como con el sumo sacerdote y algunos nobles de Jerusalen.
(11) In its interpretation of Esther 5:2 it states that Achashverosh made an oath to Sanballat and Toviah, the leaders of the opposition to Nehemiah's building of the walls of Jerusalem, because he feared a rebellion in Israel.
In the Nehemiah Memoir, as the passages are called, Yehud appears as a region that is not under the direct rule of the Persian Empire, but is ruled by a number of indigenous rulers, each of whom appeared to display a certain degree of deference to Sanballat, who operated from Samaria.
While Nehemiah inveighs against Sanballat and Tobiah, it is clear that they were self-professing Yahwists.
Other topics include archaeology and textual evidence from Sanballat, questions of Assyrian activity in the West, and an intriguing article by Susan Ackerman on apotropaic figurines and other protective traditions used for doorposts and elsewhere as a possible avenue of interpretation for cryptic references in Exodus 38:8 and 1 Sam 2:22.
The homecoming exiles, led by Ezra and Nehemiah, began to rebuild Jerusalem and the Temple, arousing the wrath of Sanballat, governor of Samaria, who "jeered at the Jews front of his companions and garrison in Samaria." (Ezra 4).
In 1990, the now Weatherbys supremo Johnny decided he wanted to be a jockey and would come to ride his own horse, Sanballat, on a pretty regular basis.
Concerning Antiquities 11, Johnson offers a fascinating discussion of how Josephus's description of the quarrel over intermarriage between the Samaritan Sanballat and the Jewish high priest Jaddus became uprooted from its original context in the time of Nehemiah and relocated to the time of Alexander, and how it functions as an "anti-Samaritan Jewish fiction" (70).
13:4-5), and married one of his sons to Sanballat's daughter (13:28).