Sancho IV


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Sancho IV

(Sancho the Brave) (sän`chō), 1257?-1295, Spanish king of Castile and León (1284–95), son and successor of Alfonso XAlfonso X
(Alfonso the Wise), 1221–84, Spanish king of Castile and León (1252–84); son and successor of Ferdinand III, whose conquests of the Moors he continued, notably by taking Cádiz (1262).
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. On the death (1275) of his elder brother, Ferdinand de la Cerda, Sancho was designated as Alfonso's successor by a coalition of nobles. Throughout his reign Sancho was forced to defend his throne against the claims of Ferdinand de la Cerda's heirs, who at times received the support of Aragón. He conquered (1292) Tarifa from the Moors. His son, Ferdinand IVFerdinand IV,
1285–1312, Spanish king of Castile and León (1295–1312), son and successor of Sancho IV. His mother, María de Molina, was regent during his turbulent minority.
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, succeeded him under the regency of Sancho's widow, María de Molina.
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References in periodicals archive ?
6) of Maria de Molina--the wife of Sancho IV of Castile--is the subject of important revision by Janice North.
In some cases, like that of King Sancho IV of Castille (1284-1295), forbidden sexual relationships were used to explain the loss of Christian armies in battle; in the case of Alfonso VI's relationship with the Muslim princess Zaida which resulted in her conversion, this was made to signal Christians triumphalism over the domination of Islam.
(10) Situated on the Bay of Biscay, the region ruled by Don Lope was a strategically vital territory whose possession was to cause endless political conflicts for Castile, especially during Sancho IV's subsequent reign and that of his son Fernando IV.
Probablemente aquellas mujeres llevaran entre sus pertenencias los libros de su infancia favoreciendo su difusion en las cortes hispanas, contribuyendo de alguna forma al poderoso movimiento pedagogico impulsado bajo Sancho IV de Castilla, cuya corte--como ha documentado Oscar Bizarri--fue particularmente permeable a la literatura francesa.
1237 during the reign of Fernando III; the Flores de filosofia and the Libro de los cien capitulos, both of which were probably largely compiled during the reign of Alfonso X; the Castigos de Sancho IV, which were redacted in 1292 or 1293.
discontinuity: the work was completed under his son, Sancho IV, without