Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site


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Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site

Address:PO Box 249
Eads, CO 81036

Phone:719-438-5916
Fax:719-438-5410
Web: www.nps.gov/sand/
Size: The National Park Service has acquired 920 acres within the authorized boundary, while the remainder of the 12,583 acres of land is under private and state ownership.
Established: Authorized on November 7, 2000, but will not be established until the NPS acquires enough land to provide for the preservation, commemoration, and interpretation of the Sand Creek Massacre. The NPS is working in partnership with The Conservation Fund, the Cheyenne and Arapaho tribes, Kiowa County, and the State of Colorado towards establishment of the site.
Location:Along the banks of Big Sandy Creek in Kiowa County in southeastern Colorado. The southern boundary of the site is 20 miles northeast of Eads and 10 miles north of Chivington.
Facilities:Not open to the public.
Special Features:On November 29, 1864, Colonel John M. Chivington led approximately 700 U.S. volunteer soldiers to a village of about 500 Cheyenne and Arapaho people camped along the banks of Big Sandy Creek in southeastern Colorado. Although the Cheyenne and Arapaho people believed they were under the protection of the U.S. Army, Chivington's troops attacked and killed about 150 people, mainly women, children, and the elderly. Ultimately, the massacre was condemmed following three federal investigations.

See other parks in Colorado.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nancy Stimson is chief of interpretation, education, and visitor services at Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site in Eads, Colorado.
Establishment of the Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site would be final recognition of American military might used against an essentially defenseless native civilian population," said Alicia Seyler, NPCA's American Indian liaison.
Mary today is in Eads, Colorado, dedicating the Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site.
On the state's eastern plains, Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site will commemorate the deaths of more than 150 Cheyenne and Arapaho who were killed in November 1864 by 700 soldiers from the Colorado Cavalry.