Sandblasting

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sandblasting

[′san‚blast·iŋ]
(engineering)
Surface treatment in which steel grit, sand, or other abrasive material is blown against an object to produce a roughened surface or to remove dirt, rust, and scale.
(geology)
Abrasion affected by the action of hard, windblown mineral grains.

Sandblasting

Abrading a surface, such as concrete, by a stream of sand ejected from a nozzle by compressed air; used for cleaning up construction joints, or carried deeper to expose the aggregate.
References in periodicals archive ?
After the sand-blasting accident in 2001, he can no longer move his left arm.
Birmingham City Council, which has an obligation to protect listed buildings, said the unique facade would be 'ruined' by an intensive sand-blasting programme.
Sand-blasting the structure clean was not an option because it was feared the process would ruin the building's facade.
4] solution and with the sand-blasting method and the cuffing performances of the coated tools and an uncoated tool were compared.
The second pretreatment method included sand-blasting with #150 silcon carbide (SiC) particles, chemical etching of the cobalt from the surface with HCl-[HNO.
The recession before cutting was approximately 11 [micro]m for the inserts pretreated by sand-blasting.
Three screw conveyors and a cross-screw conveyor bring used material from the sand-blasting process into a bucket elevator, which carries it to an air wash where the steel grit is separated from the debris.
A 100-pound bag of sand costs about $10 and a sand-blasting shop could use 10 to 15 bags per day.
Established in 1983, AFS represents a wide variety of finishing and sand-blasting equipment with offices in Portland and Seattle.
Railtrack, which owns the signal box just yards to the north of the platforms, has been ordered to leave the exterior of the structure alone following plans for a major sand-blasting operation.
But the scheme has been given the red light by conservationists at the city council because of concerns that the sand-blasting would alter building's character.