sandfly

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Related to Sandflies: sandfly fever

sandfly

[′san‚flī]
(invertebrate zoology)
Any of various small biting Diptera, especially of the genus Phlebotomus, which are vectors for phlebotomus (sandfly) fever.
References in periodicals archive ?
Three fixed houses were selected in each village and sandflies were collected by sticky paper traps twice a month from the beginning (April) to the end (October) of sandflies active season.
In this study CHPV RNA was detected in one of the two pools of sandflies collected from affected locality in Khangaon village, Wardha district.
Parola and associates trapped sandflies near dog kennels and horse stables surrounding Marseille and Nice over 7 days during the summer of 2005.
what them ants don't eat, the sandflies do, and what they leave the mosquitoes git.
Backbreaking portages around rapids, the relentlessly repetitive diet of pemmican and bannock seasoned with sandflies and no-see-ums, and regular bashing against rocks necessitating repair and downtime, took their toll on crew morale.
Swallows, sandflies, and robins are making their debuts, and pine pollen is affecting people as never before.
The disease, which is transmitted by blood-sucking sandflies, affects more than 12 million people worldwide, mainly in tropical and subtropical areas, with a growing number of cases in southern Europe.
Leishmaniasis is caused by a parasite harbored in rodents and certain primates, which is then transmitted to humans by sandflies.
Your holiday can so easily be spoiled by bites from mosquitoes and sandflies.
When an Institute of Medicine report called the Gulf a "hostile environment," it wasn't referring to the Iraqis--but to extreme heat, humidity, rainfall, dust and sand, sandflies and other insects, smoke from oil well fires, leaded diesel fuel and fumes, pesticides and insecticides, chemical agent-resistant paints, solvents, and depleted uranium shells.
Fifteen miles of track are now behind us and, for the first time, we are free of sandflies, which lurk below the timberline waiting for us to rejoin them.
Scientists experimenting with the salivary glands of sandflies are finding that a little spit can go a long way when it comes to enhancing parasitic infectivity.