Sanhedrin


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Related to Sanhedrin: Caiaphas, Sadducees, Pharisees

Sanhedrin

(sănhĕd`rĭn), ancient Jewish legal and religious institution in Jerusalem that appears to have exercised the functions of a court between c.63 B.C. and c.A.D. 68. The accounts of it in the Mishna do not correspond to those in Josephus or in the New Testament. Rabbinic sources generally portray it as a body of Torah scholars presided over by the leader of the Pharisees. Greek sources view it as an aristocratic council led by the high priest. Some sources describe a body of 71 members, others of 23 members. Some scholars maintain that there probably were two Sanhedrins—one political and civil, and the Great Sanhedrin, purely religious. In 1807, Napoleon appointed a "French Sanhedrin" of 71 members, made up of both rabbis and laymen, to consider the relationship between Jews and the state.

Bibliography

See H. Mantel, Studies in the History of the Sanhedrin (1961).

Sanhedrin

Judaism
1. the supreme judicial, ecclesiastical, and administrative council of the Jews in New Testament times, having 71 members
2. a similar tribunal of 23 members having less important functions and authority
References in periodicals archive ?
According to TB Sanhedrin 11b, that is only the case if the 15th day of this month is after the March equinox.
This understanding represents a major break with the mainstream view of the Jewish tradition, best articulated in this Talmudic passage (Babylonian Talmud, Tractate Sanhedrin 97a):
1) In the sections that follow, I will make a brief description on the historical review between the views on "charisma and office; to later explain the terms of Sanhedrin, elders-presbuteros and bishops-episkopos in their social context as foundation for a postcolonial reading of Acts 21, and a final conclusion.
See Rashi, commenting on the BABVYLONIAN TALMUD, Sanhedrin 73a (s.
57) Similarly, Rabbi Isaac Lampronti (Ferrara, 1679-1756), editor of the landmark Talmudic encyclopedia, Pahad Yitzhak, insisted that we must deal fairly and equitably with non-Jews, as Maimonides had ruled that the law follows Rabbi Joshua in the Talmud Sanhedrin 105a, namely, the pious of all nations have a share in the age to come.
The Sanhedrin referred his case to the Roman authority, which alone, at that time, had the authority to impose the penalty of death on any of its subjects.
Since Christians generally first become aware of the Sanhedrin in the context of Jesus arrest, it can seem like this power machine leaped from the shadows wholly formed.
14) Maimonides derived his idea from the Talmudic rule that only the Jews living in Eretz Israel are considered Kahal, and this requirement is raised in the context of a Talmudic discussion on the authority of the Sanhedrin.
Tanach (Hebrew Scriptures) is stringent in its prohibition of idolatry, but we should also pay attention both to the debates in Avodah Zarah about one's comportment with forms of idolatry as well as Rabbi Akiva's pronouncement in the Jerusalem Talmud's Sanhedrin (approx.
Four "favorite" topics of Jewish scholars serve as apt prisms for revealing such underlying dynamics: Jesus' Last Supper as a Passover meal, his Sanhedrin trial, his "blasphemy" verdict, and his pairing with Barabbas.
O paham na fuasai Sanhedrin blaenllaw ac enwog ein cenedl wedi codi ei llais ynglyen 'r fath sefyllfa drist?
Citing Joel 4, the Sanhedrin warns the UN General Assembly not to hold a plenum debate this Wednesday on the anti-Israel Goldstone Report.