Sankt-Peterburgskie Vedomosti


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Sankt-Peterburgskie Vedomosti

 

(St. Petersburg Bulletin), a Russian newspaper, the continuation of the newspaper Vedomosti. It was published in St. Petersburg by the Academy of Sciences, twice a week from 1728 and daily beginning in 1800 (from no. 187 in 1914 it was called Petrogradskie vedomosti). G. F. Miller, la. Ia. Shtellin, and M. V. Lomonosov were among its first editors.

The newspaper elucidated domestic and foreign political events, as well as science, art, industry, and trade. From 1863 to 1874, Sankt-Peterburgskie vedomosti was one of the most liberal press organs, printing articles by writers and scholars of the democratic camp. In 1875 the newspaper was placed under the jurisdiction of the Ministry of Public Education. From 1905 it was close to the Octobrists. Sankt-Peterburgskie vedomosti ceased publication in 1917.

References in periodicals archive ?
(32) "Spornaiavysotnost': Liubaia mnogoetazhka Peterburga stala razdrazhat' obshchestvennykh aktivistov," Sankt-Peterburgskie vedomosti, 22 September 2008, via Peterburgskii pravovoi portal (http://ppt.ru/news/56692, accessed 5 May 2015).
(41) Interview in Sankt-Peterburgskie vedomosti, 1994, reprinted in "Akademik Likhachev protiv neboskreba," Sankt-Peterburgskie vedomosti, 1 September 2009 (http://old.spbvedomosti.ru/ article.htm?id=10260771@SV_ArticIes, accessed 27 March 2015).
(26) "Vserossiiskaia vystavka loshadei v Moskve." Sankt-Peterburgskie vedomosti, 18 Nov.
The Sankt-Peterburgskie vedomosti also wrote in 1865 about the prevalence of "persons who drag their dogs along behind them, not infrequently offering them paternal instruction either by whip or stick, and entirety unembarrassed by the presence of others." (1865), Jan.
(39) Sankt-Peterburgskie vedomosti (1865) 28 Jan./9 Feb., no.
(45) In an announcement in the Saint Petersburg press during 1866, the ROPZh stated that it "accepts as members Russians and foreigners of either sex and without regard to their rank or abode [emphasis added]." Sankt-Peterburgskie vedomosti (1866), 28 December, no.
(96) As published in the Sankt-Peterburgskie vedomosti (1866), 24 March, no.
One, the author of a lengthy piece in an 1865 edition of the Sankt-Peterburgskie vedomosti, contrasted the "wretched" conditions of the London proletariat--high rates of unemployment, homelessness, crime, violence, and numerous orphans--with the existence of a home for stray dogs on Hollingsworth Street.
Andrei Ivanovich Tsybulenko was absent, as Sankt-Peterburgskie vedomosti dryly noted, "for reasons beyond his control." (2) Tsybulenko had been arrested that morning when the ship docked in the naval base of Kronshtadt following a tip off from the Russian consul in Christiana.
(55) Sankt-Peterburgskie vedomosti meanwhile shifted attention to the crowds that had gathered around the ship on Vasil'evskii Island to see the "brave sailors and their fragile little boat." (56) The newspaper emphasized both the commercial and the patriotic significance of the voyage: "The passage navigated from the Enisei to the shores of Europe by a little sailing boat shows the full possibility of establishing steamship navigation that connects the Enisei, and thereby virtually the whole of Siberia, with Europe by a cheap trade route.
(1) Sankt-Peterburgskie vedomosti, 21 November 1877, no.