Santal

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Santal

 

the largest group among the Munda peoples of India. Concentrated chiefly in Bihar State, the Santal are also found in the western parts of Bengal and Orissa. They number approximately 4 million (1971 census) and speak Santali, a language of the Munda family. Their religion is Hinduism, but forest, mountain, and other spirits are also worshiped. The social structure of the Santal retains vestiges of primitive communal relations. Agriculture is the primary occupation, but hunting and gathering are also important. Many Santal work on plantations, in factories, in coal mines, and as dockworkers.

REFERENCE

Narody Iuzhnoi Azii. Moscow, 1963.
References in periodicals archive ?
Medicinal plants and formulations used by the Soren clan of the Santal tribe in Rajshahi district, Bangladesh for treatment of various ailments.
the Santals are one of the most disadvantaged and vulnerable indigenous communities in Bangladesh.
To illustrate and clarify this argument, I shall present some performative aspects of two types of possession, connected with healing powers among the Santals in Bengal and among the Tulus of South Kanara.
Jain shows two traditional scrolls from the Santal tribe spread in parts of central and eastern India to illustrate his point.
The language of the Santals is Santali, a member of the Munda family of languages.
Although there is no consensus among either scholars or the Santals themselves about their original habitat, by the mid-eighteenth century large numbers of Santals were found in the Chotanagpur tribal belt in central India, who eventually migrated to the Rajmahal hills in the Indian state of Bihar.
23) The Santals are a numerical dominant tribal group in West Bengal.
Santal communities; social justice; individual strategies; modes of power; modes of resistance; legal pluralism; marginalisation;
A legal activist working on issues related to disadvantaged and displaced people, Dhagamwar explores how tribal people in her native India view government authorities, focusing on the Bhils in Maharashtra, and the Santals and Pahadiyas in what became the state of Jharkhand in 2000.
Consider, for example, societies such as the Eskimo tribes of the North American Arctic, Pygmies in Zaire, the Yurok of North America, the Ifugao of the Philippines, the Land Dyaks of Sarawak, the Kuikuru of South America, the Kabyle Berbers of Algeria, the Massims of East Paupo-Melanesia, and the Santals of India--none of which had governments (Leeson forthcoming).
The Santals (a shy people who live in tunnels beneath Pentre Gardens) believe that all life began when two birds were created.
Examples of such groups are the Amish in the United States, who choose a peasant society life style within a larger industrial society; the Santals, and the Lotha in India, who choose to live somewhere between hunter-gather and horticultural societies within a larger agricultural society, which is changing to an industrial society; the Gypsy in Romania, who are closer to a nomadic pastoral society within a larger society that has recently changed from an agricultural society to a socialist industrial society and is now again undergoing a change into a capitalist industrial society; and the Maori of New Zealand, who are a minority group in New Zealand descended from a Polynesian stock.