Santería

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Santería

(săn'tərē`ə, sän'–), religion originating in W Africa, developed by YorubaYoruba
, people of SW Nigeria and Benin, numbering about 20 million. Today many of the large cities in Nigeria (including Lagos, Ibadan, and Abeokuta) are in Yorubaland.
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 slaves in Cuba, and practiced by an estimated one million people in the United States. Blending African beliefs with those of Roman Catholicism, it fuses Christian saints with African deities (orishas). Rites are led by a priest or priestess, and reincarnation is a main belief. One of its most important rituals involves animal sacrifice, which was ruled a constitutional religious practice in a 1993 Supreme Court decision.
References in periodicals archive ?
Another example of cultural hybridity, a perfect example of Cuban artistic-religious syncretism, is the face of the statue of Jesus that watches over Havana, which bears a remarkable similarity to that of Che Guevara, just as the 'O' (for Orissa) in Santeria iconography also represents the consecrated host in Christian churches, and Christian Santa Barbara is equally a Yoruba deity.
It is important to note that the practitioners of santeria in Strawberry and Chocolate are not Afro-Cuban, but white.
One problematic term is "Santeria." It was used by outsiders to describe Lukumi practitioners as early as the first decade of the 20th century in Cuba.
Abelardo Larduet Luaces's wide-ranging study of the origins and recent history of Santeria and related folk religious practices in his natal city of Santiago de Cuba presents a refreshingly grounded approach to the field Cuban scholars designate as "popular religion." The heart of the book is his meticulously researched oral history of the way western-Cuban lineages of Ocha and Palo were introduced and established in this eastern Cuban city, the antipode of Havana.
Mantonica Wilson was a Santeria prophetess and priestess; and she introduced Lam to the spirit world of Santeria, the Afro-Cuban religion descended from beliefs that the Yoruba-speaking peoples of southwestern Nigeria and parts of Benin and Togo had brought with them to Cuba on slave ships.
Carlos Hernandez combines the strong Latin tradition of magical realism with a dose of science fiction to create The Assimilated Cuban's Guide to Quantum Santeria, an outstanding collection of short stories.
Sin perjuicio que existe un ritmo determinado para el tema de la santeria, que es el toque de los tambores de bata, los cuales ya se han utilizado tambien para generar sonidos populares, lo que ha causado una sonoridad autoctona a la musica cubana en general.
He also led the ritual chants sung in the ancestral Yoruban language of Nigeria dedicated to each of the deities in the Santeria pantheon.
Nevertheless, there is a very logical connection between the Greek literary tradition and the use of myth in the context of Santeria and in many modern Hispanic Caribbean novels.
In the contexts of colonialism and discourse over the concept of a "global" mental health, i.e., the exporting of Western psychiatry to "third world" countries, contributors discuss the evolution of indigenous healing traditions in the Caribbean; cultural/spiritual practices relating to mental health (e.g., Obeah, Vodou, Santeria, Spiritism); and integration of these multicultural traditions with Western practice.
Tackling the biggest controversy surrounding his faith, Santeria priest Ocha'ni Lele explains for the first time in print the practice and importance of animal sacrifice as a religious sacrament.
They carry everything with Santeria, statues, crosses and artifacts.