Sapindaceae


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Sapindaceae

[‚sap·ən′dās·ē‚ē]
(botany)
A family of dicotyledonous plants in the order Sapindales distinguished by mostly alternate leaves, usually one and less often two ovules per locule, and seeds lacking endosperm.

Sapindaceae

 

(soapberry), a family of dicotyledonous plants including trees, shrubs, and woody (less frequently, herbaceous) lianas. The alternate leaves are pinnate or, rarely, simple. The aromatic flowers are most often small and irregular; they are borne in terminal or axillary cymose inflorescences. There are usually five sepals and five petals. The plants are characterized by a disk that usually forms between the petals and the stamens. The gynoecium has three (sometimes two or four) carpels. The ovary is superior.

There are about 140 genera, embracing nearly 1,600 species. The plants are distributed predominantly in tropics and sub-tropics, especially in Asia and the Americas. In the USSR only a few species of the genus Koelreuteria are cultivated (as ornamentals). The bark, leaves, and fruits of soapberry plants contain a milky juice and resins. The fruits, seeds, or caruncles of many species are edible. A number of species yield a valuable lumber, and some are rich in saponins (for example, Sapindus).

References in periodicals archive ?
Ja a ocupacao da familia Sapindaceae na 7(a) posicao do ranking de variaveis relevantes apresentados pela RNA, parece estar relacionadaa frequencia desta familia nas parcelas, pois e a familia mais frequente na area em estudo aparecendo em 66% das parcelas.
When it comes to Ritha's origin and its botanical feature, it is one of the most important trees and a member of the Sapindaceae family in Asia's tropical and sub-tropical regions such as India, Australia, Ethiopia, Mediterranean countries and New Zealand.
Heavy ingestion of the immature aril (fruit) of ackee (Blighia sapida) or other members of the soapberry family (Sapindaceae), including lychee (Litchi sinensis), rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum), and longan (Dimocarpus longan), by an undernourished child with low glycogen/glucose stores probably has the potential to result in toxic hypoglycemic syndrome.
angustifolia (Sapindaceae) resulted in the isolation of four kaempferol methyl ethers, which exhibited antibacterial and antioxidant activities (Teffo et al., 2010).
IntroductionThe mad honey intoxication appears to be a clinical manifestation of use of grayanotoxin (GTX) isolated from the honey made by bees from the Rhododendron plant flowers mainly Ericaceae and Sapindaceae families.1