Sapphira


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Sapphira

(səfī`rə), wife of AnaniasAnanias
[Gr.,=Heb. Ananiah and Hananiah]. 1 In the Acts of the Apostles, man who, with his wife Sapphira, held back part of a gift to the early Jerusalem church and lied about it. They were rebuked by Peter and fell dead. The name has become a term for liar.
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Sapphira

New Testament the wife of Ananias, who together with her husband was struck dead for fraudulently concealing their wealth from the Church (Acts 5)
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The brutal story of Ananias and Sapphira reminds us that some cut corners in order to hedge their bets with the Christianity thing.
Even as a busy expert in family law issues, Sian finds time to look after daughters Sapphira, nine, and six-year-old Tara.
The transnational modernism central to Lowe's analysis finds its domestic counterpart in the transregional modernism articulated so powerfully by John Matthews in his essay "Willa Cather and the Burden of Southern History" Working against regionalist expectations, Matthews finds in My Antonia (1918) and, in a different way, Sapphira and the Slave Girl (1940), a valuable engagement with "Uncle Sam's other province" His counterintuitive reading of My Antonia proves especially brilliant as he finds in Jim Burden's discomfited response to the black pianist Blind D'Arnault a revealing instance of how "bad historical conscience" can prove surprisingly productive of cultural fantasy.
(6) It later became a possibility, as we see in the deaths of Ananias and Sapphira (Acts 5:1-11), who represented, as I see it, the system of accumulation, selfishness and falsehood.
He weaves Old and New Testament contexts together in the Book of Acts as he applies the scriptures to the 21st century, comparing for example, Ananias and Sapphira with Achan.
Glasgow's The Battle-Ground, Barren Ground, and The Voice of the People are juxtaposed with Carrier's Virginia novel, Sapphira and the Slave Girl, in order to highlight on the one hand the writers' nostalgic attraction to the antebellum family and on the other their interest in industrious farm women and approval of strict segregation as a necessary modern reality.
After Pentecost, Ananias and Sapphira decided to withhold portions of the proceeds of the sale of their property; their sin was a violence against the Eucharistic unity of the church.
3:13), and the punishment of Annanias and Sapphira (Acts 5:1-11).--"The Quest for an Anabaptist Atonement: Violence and Nonviolence in J.
When one looks for Scriptural examples that a client might identify with to discover something of one's own interactional style, one might point to Ananias and Sapphira (Acts 5) or Simon Magus (Acts 8) as examples of those with some of the tendencies characteristic of this type.
In Cox's view, Acts's focus on individual transformation goes both ways, sometimes featuring spiritual health but sometimes drawing attention to "spiritual sickness." This is the case with Ananias and Sapphira who, as Cox puts it with amazing brevity, are "Christians on the outside but godless on the inside" (98).
Death Comes for the Archbishop provides the key to viewing Cather's subsequent fiction: the stories in Obscure Destinies (1928-31), especially "Neighbour Rosicky," about a natural father with a life as fulfilling as Latour's; Shadows on the Rock (1931), portraying a French-Canadian counterpart to the faith community of the Archbishop; Lucy Gayheart (1935) and Sapphira and the Slave Girl (1940), both painful sortings out of guilt; and, finally, the story of rebirth, release from bondage after harsh punishment, set in medieval Avignon, France, that Cather left unfinished at her death in 1947.
Callista, who has a younger sister, Sapphira, two, and who lives with her family, mum Alex, and dad John, 38, an engineer, in St Nicolas Park, Nuneaton, will finish her treatment next autumn.