saprophyte

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saprophyte

(săp`rəfīt'), any plant that depends on dead plant or animal tissue for a source of nutrition and metabolic energy, e.g., most fungi (molds) and a few flowering plants, such as Indian pipe and some orchids. Most saprophytes do not produce chlorophyll and therefore do not photosynthesize; they are thus dependent on the food energy they absorb from the decaying tissues, which they help to break down.

Saprophyte

 

a plant that feeds on the organic matter of dead organisms or on the excrement of living organisms. Their type of feeding places saprophytes in the group of heterotrophic organisms. Saprophytes and autotrophic organisms play an important role in the cycle of matter in nature; saprophytes promote the decomposition of carcasses and animal excrement into water, carbon dioxide, ammonia, and other inorganic compounds.

Saprophytes are found mainly among bacteria, actinomy-cetes, and fungi. Typical algal saprophytes are Polytoma of the family Chlamydomonadinaceae and Prototheca of the family Protococcales. Some saprophytes transfer to a parasitic mode of existence. A number of photosynthesizing organisms, such as some green algae, may also feed saprophytically.

Flowering plants of the families Pyrolaceae, Orchidaceae, and Burmanniaceae are sometimes considered as saprophytes, but it is more accurate to regard them as mycotrophic parasitic plants. The plants receive nutrient matter from the soil via a mycorrhizal fungus, and they are also marked by photosynthesis.

E. S. TEREKHIN

saprophyte

[′sap·rə‚fīt]
(botany)
A plant that lives on decaying organic matter.

saprophyte

any plant that lives and feeds on dead organic matter using mycorrhizal fungi associated with its roots; a saprotrophic plant
References in periodicals archive ?
b) Most fungal invaders are opportunistic saprophytes
2007; Masaphy, 2010), as well as concerning its ecological interactions like mycorrhizal, saprophytes or facultatives (Dahlstrom et al.
On the other hand, the saprophytes who have returned after the war's conclusions have done so to feed on the corpse of their country, which constitutes a different kind of betrayal to the narrator.
On the contrary, in the case of plants, there was a nematode population already established, providing the PNF with additional sources of nutrients, enabling them to colonize faster and more prolifically than other saprophytes.
The only exceptions to this are extreme parasites such as dodder (which have lost their chlorophyll) and saprophytes such as the ghost orchid, most fungi, and bacteria.
Actually, that activity is carried out by a class of fungi called saprophytes, which are likely to be active anywhere there are accumulations of such residues on or under the soil surface.
It has been claimed that biochar can influence microbial activity by providing a favourable microhabitat (pore space), due to its weak alkalinity and by being a substrate unfavourable for saprophytes (Saito and Marumoto 2002).
Most of the species we identified using genetic techniques are soil saprophytes or plant pathogens.
Several bacterial species associated with captive sea turtles have been identified including saprophytes and potential pathogens [2, 5].
The five fungal endophytes in this study with rapid growth may belong to the category of aggressive saprophytes as theorized by Bacon & White (2000).