Sarmatia


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Related to Sarmatia: Sauromatae

Sarmatia

(särmā`shə), ancient district between the Vistula River and the Caspian Sea, gradually conquered and occupied by the Sarmatians [Lat. Sarmatae] or Sauromatians (a term used by Herodotus and now used by archaeologists for early Sarmatians) from the 6th cent. B.C. through the 4th cent. A.D. The term is vague and is also used to refer to the territory along the Danube and across the Carpathians where the Sarmatians were later driven by the Huns. The Sarmatians, who by c.200 B.C. controlled the territory W of the Don River, spoke an Indo-Iranian language and were a nomadic pastoral people related to the Scythians (see ScythiaScythia
, ancient region of Eurasia, extending from the Danube on the west to the borders of China on the east. The Scythians flourished from the 8th to the 4th cent. B.C. They spoke an Indo-Iranian language but had no system of writing.
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), whom they displaced in the Don region. The main divisions were the Rhoxolani, the Iazyges, and the Alans or Alani. They came into conflict with the Romans but later allied themselves with Rome, acting as buffers against the Goths. They were scattered by or assimilated with the Goths and then the Huns by the 6th cent. A.D. Graves of warrior women among Sarmatian burial mounds has led to speculation that they may have given rise to the myth of the AmazonsAmazon
, in Greek mythology, one of a tribe of warlike women who lived in Asia Minor. The Amazons had a matriarchal society, in which women fought and governed while men performed the household tasks.
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.

Bibliography

See study by T. Sulimirski (1970).

Sarmatia

 

a name used to designate the area north of the Black Sea in the first century B.C., when the Scythians who had been living there were forced out by the Sarmatians. The term “Sarmatia” first appeared on an ancient map drawn up by the Roman commander Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa.

Sarmatia

the ancient name of a region between the Volga and Vistula Rivers now covering parts of Poland, Belarus, and SW Russia
References in periodicals archive ?
En la version que ofrece De Totis, en esta Caduta del regno dell'Amazzoni, la reina en este caso es Mandane, enamorada del rey de Sarmatia, protagoniza la narracion junto a su hermana Mitilene, quien encabeza la fuerza de oposicion a los hombres y ambas dos sometidas a un encarnizado enfrentamiento entre ellas por causa del amor de la primera, en parrafos en los que se puede leer que "crede l'huomo un vivo inferno, ma quest'alma, che l'adora, un cielo crederia, si fosse eterno" (22), mientras que la segunda, a priori, representa la personificacion de la confrontacion contra el genero masculino, oponiendose a cualquier tipo de concordia "per che ecclissa a bel valor la luce [.
This version claims Arthur was born on the eastern fringes of the Roman empire in Sarmatia, south of modern-day Russia, as Lucius Artorius Castus, before coming to Britain.
In contrast, the main contribution of the Armenian redaction is to supplement the brief classical section regarding the Sasanian Empire with an original survey of the region according to the same methodology and approach, beginning at Asiatic Sarmatia.
In Bialowieza, the memory of ancient Sarmatia and its bearskin-clad warriors could fuel the dreams of the true believers of pan-Slavic nationalism; only in such unsettled margins of civilization could the Romantic obsession with returning to while at the same time mystifying "the Source" be played out, could Eden be located in the Cotswolds, paradise in the Carpathian Alps.
were the Antipodes of European Sarmatia [Poland], and lived in a most frigid zone around the antarctic pole, as was proved by the day there having only four hours".
The national oil and gas companies of the two nations are parties to the Sarmatia International Pipeline Company.
The shallowest conditions (with Tremadocian conglomerates and sandstones and post-Tremadocian glauconite limestones) were common in the Lublin area in northeastern Poland, to the west of Sarmatia.
Certainly, the latest theory is that the dragon symbol came to Britain in the 2nd Century AD with Roman cavalrymen from Sarmatia, now southwest Russia.
Between Sarmatia and Socialism: The Life and Work of Johannes Bobrowski.
The mosaic formed in the course of terrain accretionary processes, which created a series of Palaeoproterozoic orogenic belts towards the edges of Archaean protocratons: along the western and southwestern borders of Karelia and Volgo-Uralia and along the northwestern border of Sarmatia (Bogdanova et al.