saros

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Related to Saros cycle: Metonic cycle

saros:

see eclipseeclipse
[Gr.,=failing], in astronomy, partial or total obscuring of one celestial body by the shadow of another. Best known are the lunar eclipses, which occur when the earth blocks the sun's light from the moon, and solar eclipses, occurring when the moon blocks the sun's light
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saros

(sair -os) The period of 6585.32 days (about 18 years) that elapses before a particular sequence of solar and lunar eclipses can recur in the same order and with approximately the same time intervals. Following such a period, the Earth, Sun, Moon, and nodes of the Moon's orbit return to about the same relative positions: the period is equal to 223 synodic months and is almost equal to 19 eclipse years (6585.78 days). An eclipse repeated after one saros occurs 0.32 days later and hence 115°W of its predecessor. The saros was known in ancient times.

Saros

 

the period over which solar and lunar eclipses are repeated in the same sequence as a result of the repetition of the relative positions of the sun, the moon, and the nodes of the lunar orbit on the celestial sphere. The saros was known in Egypt and Greece several centuries before the Common Era. It is approximately equal to 6,585 1/3 days, that is, 18 years and 10 1/3 or 11 1/3 days, depending on the number of leap years in the period under consideration. During one saros there are 43 solar eclipses (12 total, two mixed annular and total, 14 annular, and 15 partial) and 28 lunar eclipses; for various reasons, the number of eclipses in different periods may vary somewhat. Eclipses can be predicted approximately on the basis of the saros, but without an exact indication of the areas of visibility or times of onset.

saros

[′sa‚räs]
(astronomy)
A cycle of time after which the centers of the sun and moon, and the nodes of the moon's orbit return to the same relative position; this period is 18 years 11⅓ days, or 18 years 10⅓ days if 5 rather than 4 leap years are included.

Saros

Gulf of. an inlet of the Aegean in NW Turkey, north of the Gallipoli Peninsula. Length: 59 km (37 miles). Width: 35 km (22 miles)
References in periodicals archive ?
Because the astronomical conditions conducive to generating large tides match the Saros cycle, their recurrence at 18.03 year intervals is expected.
Checking the multiples of the Saros against storm tides, we discover that the storm tides of 1759 and 1869 correlate very closely with predicted high tides of the Saros cycle (Table 24).
In more recent times, Edmond Halley discovered that solar eclipses also follow saros cycles. This is a cycle that repeats every 6,585.33 days (about 18 years, 11 days).
Both cuneiform texts are so-called Saros Cycle Texts, which present eclipse possibilities arranged in an eighteen-year cycle.
"One snowy afternoon," Denise recalls, "Leo and I spent three hours on the living room floor talking about everything one could imagine about eclipses." From the science of the saros cycle to the feeling one gets in the path of totality, their conversation sailed off into a heaven of orbits and shadows.
Eighteen years, or one saros cycle, later, the partial eclipse was repeated, this time on October 13, 2004, from Mauna Kea (S&T: March 2005, page 112).
The year 1605 was an extraordinary one for "eclipses in the sun and moon." Although the April 3rd lunar eclipse was part of a saros cycle that is no longer active in our time, both the autumn eclipses will be repeated this spring.
The Moon's shadow was still racing toward the eastern horizon when my brain inexplicably began to calculate: 1999-1963 = 36; 36/2 = 18 = 1 saros cycle. Suddenly I realized that I'd been around the eclipse block exactly twice, from Maine in 1963 to Turkey in 1999.
Unlike the eclipse that preceded this one in Saros cycle 120 and crossed the Pacific Northwest and southern Canada in February 1979, this shadow track traversed some of the world's least-populated areas.
There are 80 Saros cycles running at any one time, and in 54 years the Saros periods overlap so that eclipses return to roughly the same place.
He follows that with a rather long discussion of saros series (the cycles that govern the periodicity and recurrence of eclipses) and inex series (the time intervals between consecutively numbered saros cycles).