Sarracenia


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Related to Sarracenia: Sarracenia flava

Sarracenia

 

(pitcher plant), a genus of plants of the family Sarraceniaceae. Pitcher plants are insectivorous perennial herbs. The rhizome, which reaches 25–30 cm in length and grows for 20 to 30 years, annually forms rosettes of pitcher-shaped leaves. The leaves, which measure up to 75–100 cm long and 5–8 cm across, usually have reddish veins and in bright sunlight often turn completely red. The species S. flava, commonly known as trumpets, has yellowish green leaves with red venation. The flowers of pitcher plants are solitary, large (4–10 cm across), and pentamerous; the petals are yellow (S. flava) or reddish purple. The style is broadened at the top into an umbrella-like structure that covers the stamens.

There are ten species of pitcher plants, distributed in North America, mainly along the eastern seaboard of the USA. The most common species is S. purpurea. Pitcher plants grow mainly in swampy forests and in sphagnum marshes.

References in periodicals archive ?
Other studies of Sarracenia purpurea have found similar results, but the particular taxa dominating captures differ among sites.
The two forested bays (Buttress and Cypress) had seed banks that were well separated in ordination space from herbaceous and shrubby bays, but the shrubby bays (Little Cypress and Woods) were only slightly different from the herbaceous bays (Dry, Sarracenia and Woodward).
Bradshaw (1983) observed a preference of females for larger pitchers when mosquitoes were ovipositing in a hybrid of Sarracenia purpurea and S.
Although no previous study has investigated the effects of group size per se on prey capture in carnivorous plants, one experiment did manipulate plant density in Sarracenia purpurea, finding no difference between per-leaf capture rates in half-ambient vs.
The purple pitcher plant, Sarracenia purpurea , is a northern species but quite different: The pitchers are low, squat and clustered.
Tall form pitchers of the genus Sarracenia and their associates are disappearing from the southeastern United States.
Nevertheless, in spite or perhaps because of the proximity of their publication dates, this hoax in fact shows the greatest debt to Darwin's work on both evolution and carnivorous plants, as its (fictional) author compares the contents of the letter he is about to share with Darwin's "studies of drosera and sarracenia [the North American pitcher plant]," and compares himself to Darwin publishing on evolution: "My special and only motive for publishing prematurely [...] is similar to that which influenced Darwin to bring out his book on the origin of species" (Arment, Botanica Delira 47).
The pitcher plant (Sarracenia purpurea) was traditionally used as a source of obtaining a never-failing memory (Mooney and Olbechts 2005, 101).
In Sarracenia purpurea, Hymenoptera (Formicidae), Coleoptera, and Gastropoda constitute 69% of total mass of prey.