Saugus Iron Works National Historic Site

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See also: National Parks and Monuments (table)National Parks and Monuments

National Parks
Name Type1 Location Year authorized Size
acres (hectares)
Description
Acadia NP SE Maine 1919 49,075 (19,868) Mountain and coast scenery.
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Saugus Iron Works National Historic Site:

see National Parks and MonumentsNational Parks and Monuments

National Parks
Name Type1 Location Year authorized Size
acres (hectares)
Description
Acadia NP SE Maine 1919 49,075 (19,868) Mountain and coast scenery.
..... Click the link for more information.
 (table).
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Saugus Iron Works National Historic Site

Address:244 Central St
Saugus, MA 01906

Phone:781-233-0050
Fax:781-231-7345
Web: www.nps.gov/sair/
Size: 8.5 acres.
Established: Authorized on April 5, 1968.
Location:In Saugus, Massachusetts, 8.5 miles north of Boston. Accessible via I-95 (Walnut St. Exit), US 1 north (Main St. Exit), or US 1 south ((Walnut St. Exit).
Facilities:Picnic area, rest rooms (é), visitor center (é), museum/exhibit, self-guided tour/trail.
Activities:Educational programs and tours.
Special Features:This is the site of the first integrated ironworks in North America (1646-1668). It includes the reconstructed blast furnace, the forge, the rolling and slitting mill, and a restored 17th-century house.

See other parks in Massachusetts.
Parks Directory of the United States, 5th Edition. © 2007 by Omnigraphics, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is now known that her ancestor James Taylor worked at the Saugus Iron Works around 1653 and Ms Thibodeau said of the research: "It was an incredible experience.
The Saugus Iron Works, as it is known, was a financial failure, as so many first attempts are, but it now is a national historic site--and well it should be, for it was the start of a great American industry.
After they had restored signs at Salem and Saugus Iron Works National Historic Sites--including one for the historic Custom House, which once employed Nathaniel Hawthorne--the teens, ever the entrepreneurs, approached Law about expanding the program to other states.
Here are several New England sites that made the cut: Plimoth Plantation in Plymouth; Saugus Iron Works National Historic Site in Saugus; Strawbery Banke in Portsmouth, N.H.; Minute Man National Historical Park in Lexington; Boston National Historical Park in Boston; Historic Deerfield in Deerfield; The Old Manse in Concord; Slater Mill in Pawtucket, R.I.; Adams National Historical Park in Quincy; and, of course, Old Sturbridge Village in Sturbridge.
Annually, the Iron Guild puts on an iron pouring demonstration at the Saugus Iron Works National Park and a Halloween show at the Steel Yard in Providence, R.I.
In 1948 archeologists verified that a now overgrown and urbanized landscape along the Saugus River (Massachusetts) was the site of the Saugus Iron Works from 1646 until 1648.
The Park Service operates two sites here: Salem Maritime and Saugus Iron Works. A visitor center developed and operated by both parks is situated in downtown Salem.
1646--America's first iron foundry (and second industrial plant), Saugus Iron Works, near Boston, pours the first American casting, the Saugus pot.
"The site is only two miles from the ocean--between the port cities of Boston and Salem--so it was easy to get raw materials in and finished products out," says Amy Curry, park ranger and education coordinator at Saugus Iron Works National Historical Site.
The first casting produced by Saugus Iron Works was an iron cooking pot cast in a small clay mold buried in the ground.
These early American parks which include Ocmulgee National Monument in Georgia, Fort Raleigh National Historic Site in North Carolina, De Soto National Memorial in Florida, El Morro National Monument in New Mexico, San Juan National Historic Site in Puerto Rico, Roger Williams National Memorial in Rhode Island, and Saugus Iron Works National Historic Site in Massachusetts, as well as several state and private historical parks--represent the complex interplay of European, African, and American Indian cultures involved in the struggle for North America.
1642 - America's first iron foundry (and second industrial plant), Saugus Iron Works, near Boston, pours the first American casting, the Saugus pot.