Sauropoda


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Sauropoda

[sȯ′räp·əd·ə]
(paleontology)
A group of fully quadrupedal, seemingly herbivorous dinosaurs from the Jurassic and Cretaceous periods in the suborder Sauropodomorpha; members had small heads, spoon-shaped teeth, long necks and tails, and columnar legs.

Sauropoda

 

a suborder of extinct herbivorous reptiles of the order Saurischia. They lived in the Jurassic and Cretaceous periods. Sauropoda were among the largest animals that ever existed (up to 30 m). They were characterized by a massive but relatively short torso, columnar legs, a long neck and tail, and a relatively small head. They probably lived in large bodies of water, such as large lakes and intracontinental seas. There were two families comprising a large number of genera and species, including Diplodocus, Apatosaurus (Brontosaurus), Brachyosaums, and Camarasaurus. Numerous Sauropoda remains have been found on all the continents; in the USSR they have been found in Transbaikalia and Fergana.

REFERENCE

Osnovy paleontologii: Zemnovodnye, presmykaiushchiesia i ptitsy. Moscow, 1964.
References in periodicals archive ?
No more relevant features are present in order to propose a more precise position within Sauropoda for this specimen, and it should be considered as Sauropoda indet.
At the moment, we consider that this vertebra does not present any significant feature in order to propose a more accurate systematic approach, and we prefer to attribute it to Sauropoda indet.
x Podcnemidae x Crocodylomorpha Itasuchus jesuinoi x Peirosaurus tormini x Uberabasuchus terrificus x Dinosauria Sauropoda Titanosauria "Titanosauridae" A x "Titanosauridae" B x "Titanosauridae" C x "Titanosaurinae" x x "Titanosaurus" x Aeolosaurus sp.
(2010): Small body size and extreme cortical bone remodeling indicate phyletic dwarfism in Magyarosaurus dacus (Sauropoda: Titanosauria).
(2010): A new titanosaur genus (Dinosauria, Sauropoda) from the late Cretaceous of southern France and its paleobiogeographic implications.
(2012): Juvenile and adult teeth of the titanosaurian dinosaur Lirainosaurus (Sauropoda) from the Late Cretaceous of Iberia.
(2013a): The axial skeleton of the titanosaur Lirainosaurus astibiae (Dinosauria: Sauropoda).
As such, this absence is not a limitation to assign the footprints to Sauropoda. In fact, it could reinforce this idea.
(2010): Not just a pretty face: anatomical peculiarities in the postcranium of rebbachisaurids (Sauropoda: Diplodocoidea).
(2007): Teeth of Oplosaurus armatus (Sauropoda) from El Castellar (Teruel, Spain).
(2009): Redescription and reassessment of the phylogenetic affinities of Euhelopus zdanskyi (Dinosauria: Sauropoda) from the Early Cretaceous of China.