Saussure

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Saussure

Ferdinand de . 1857--1913, Swiss linguist. He pioneered structuralism in linguistics and the separation of scientific language description from historical philological studies
References in periodicals archive ?
Second, we present a summary of two major approaches to semiotics and argue that existing semiotic scholarship in advertising, public relations and communication, which takes a structural or Saussurean approach, has chosen between these two approaches inappropriately.
This does not mean, of course, that there were no Saussureans in America and no formalists in Europe, and even apparently strict formalists like Bloomfield were not always consistent.
He makes two key, interrelated moves -- one from the tradition of psychoanalysis and one from the tradition of Saussurean structuralism.
The linguist proposed a conceptual break in the linguistic community of his time, by remaining faithful to the thought of Saussure and the notion of structure and, within the same saussurean project, treat the subject of enunciation.
6) Clearly, on the very axis of Saussurean structuralist, semantics that an acoustic image is meaningful not by virtue of any inherent natural properly but by virtue of its difference from other such images, the author is unwilling to accept the perceptual theories of pictorial representation offered by critics such as Ernst Gombrich, Nelson Goodman and Arthur Danto.
According to this formulation, a single chip functions like a word in a Saussurean system of linguistic signification or like a discrete shape on an analytic cubist canvas (1909-11), achieving meaning only in relation to the integrated whole.
Even more importantly, deconstruction too tended to rely on a version of Saussurean linguistics.
Like EVOLIST, deconstruction was both an "approach" and the end of approaches with the advent of an ultimate truth; and like EVOLIST, deconstruction represented itself as a form of literary study consistent with science--not Darwinian biology, but Saussurean linguistics.
Even to think from within poststructuralist discourse about 'the individual' as a reality rather than a concept can only be done through the most torturous of theoretical convolutions, a predicament which is an unavoidable consequence of the Saussurean distinction between langue and parole.
It is in answer to these questions that Lacanian psychoanalysis, with its Saussurean emphasis, is here newly disclosed and highlighted, not only as the alternative to cultural reductionism and idealism, but also as a fresh post-structuralist approach to an understanding of the ways that desire and loss, life and death, become entangled in one single drive.
In this light, then, there is no deep difference between the respective role of syntax and semantics in MG and those in semantocentric or parallelistic approaches, as there is no deep difference between Chomsky's internalist semantics and "cognitive" semantics, or even between internalist semantics and earlier linguistic semantics of the Saussurean varieties developed by Lyons, Coseriu, etc.