Save-the-Redwoods League


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Save-the-Redwoods League

Address:114 Sansome St, Rm 1200
San Francisco, CA 94104

Phone:415-362-2352
Fax:415-362-7017
Phone:888-836-0005
Web: www.savetheredwoods.org
Established: 1918. Description:Dedicated to acquiring and protecting California's ancient forests. Helped to establish the Redwood park system and works on expanding permanent protection of forest lands. Six out of every ten acres of California redwoods currently protected were saved through the work of the League. Members: 50,000. Dues: $19/year.
Publications: Bulletin (biannually); free to members.

See other parks in California.
References in periodicals archive ?
He played a key role in the preservation of the state's redwoods, was a co-founder of the Save-the-Redwoods League, and advocated the idea of "interpretation.
Written with the blessing of the Save-the-Redwoods League, this is a mine of information for activists and forest managers directly involved in protecting redwoods, but should also be of interest to tree-huggers who hunger for more in-depth knowledge about forest ecology.
Since then, protectorship has been passed on to the Save-the-Redwoods League which continues to ensure that our oldest champion tree will endure like granite for centuries to come.
To day, along with groups such as Save-the-Redwoods League, the fund continues to buy land for parks in the Santa Cruz Mountains (matching funds come from the state parks department).
Last year, thanks in large part to the work and donations of the Save-the-Redwoods League, 100 acres of pastures and meadows--Roosevelt elk habitat--were added.
Later, in 1928, nearby land was being eyed by delopers, but action by the Save-the-Redwoods League helped to protect these trees, and the land was later purchased by the City of Oakland.
Adopt a redwood tree ($200) or have one planted ($50) through Save-the-Redwoods League, (415) 362-2352.
The old-growth's would-be saviors-a legion of skilled and focused environmentalists representing the Wilderness Society, Audubon, Sierra Club, Save-the-redwoods League, and dozens of smaller organizations-claim that over-logging has been an ecological disaster (see "Old-growth Movers "Shakers" on page 61).