Saw-Toothed Grain Beetle


Also found in: Wikipedia.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Saw-Toothed Grain Beetle

 

(Oryzaephilus surinamensisi), a beetle of the family Cucujidae. The body, which is 2.5–3.5 mm long, is elongated, flat, and red-brown. The prothorax has dentate edges and two grooves on the upper side. The insect is ubiquitous. It often lives in warehouses. The beetle and its larvae spoil flour, groats, grain (that has already been damaged by other pests), and dried fruits and vegetables (most often moldy ones). The saw-toothed grain beetle bears four or five generations per year in the south and two or three in the north.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Repellent and toxicity of crude plant extracts on saw-toothed grain beetle (Oryzaephilus surinamensis) (L).
'Among the more important pests are the granary weevil, rice weevil, lesser grain borer, Angoumois grain moth, confused flour beetle and the saw-toothed grain beetle. The first four mentioned are capable of attacking and destroying sound grain.
There are even more dangerous pests, such as the saw-toothed grain beetle, warehouse beetle, and rare but serious pests like the Khapra beetle.
They include the Indian meal moth, the saw-toothed grain beetle, the rusty grain beetle and the red flour beetle.
In addition to controlling roaches, the product eliminates stored product pests at the larval stage, including: Indian meal moth, saw-toothed grain beetle, red flour beetle, and others.