Sawflies


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Sawflies

 

insects of the family of true sawflies, order Hymenoptera, pests in berry fruit cultures. The most harmful are the pear slug sawfly and the plum leaf sawfly, which are found on all continents; in the USSR they cause crop losses nearly everywhere. The pear slug sawfly (Caliroa limacina) is 4-5 mm in length and is black in color. In the USSR it chiefly harms the sour cherry, sweet cherry, plum, black-thorn, pear, and quince. There are one, two, or three generations annually. The larvae eat the flesh of leaves, leaving untouched the veins and the underside of the epidermis. The plum leaf sawfly (Cladius pallipes) damages many plant cultures, especially the sour cherry, sweet cherry, blackthorn, mountain ash, pear, raspberry, and strawberry. There are two, three, or four generations a year. The larvae eat round holes in the leaves between the veins. When they multiply at a great rate, they can strip plants bare. Countermeasures include treating the plants with insecticide and fall ploughing and spading of the soil in trunk circles.

References in periodicals archive ?
78 adults of Lamachus rufiabdominalis emerged from the cocoons of sawflies, and the female to male ratio was 2.
Together, the negative correlation and negative association suggested that the needle rust could play a role in preventing sawflies from becoming abundant at elevations above 1,850 m.
Reversed latitudinal gradient in species richness of sawflies (Hymenoptera, Symphyta).
The nematine sawflies can be divided into eight informal groups based on the galling site on the host plant and gall morphology: (1) species with free-living larvae; (2) leaf folders or rollers; (3) leaf blade gallers; (4) apical leaf gallers; (5) basal leaf gallers; (6) midrib and petiole gallers; (7) stem gallers; and (8) bud gallers.
However, wing venation can vary in sawflies, but the populations exhibited no variation in genitalic morphology.
They help control garden pests such as gypsy moths, cabbage loopers, Japanese beetles, armyworms, cutworms, sawflies, codling moths, peach twig borers, pink bollworms, tent caterpillars, squash bugs and many more.
The culprits are the larvae of sawflies which look like plump caterpillars.
They're the offspring of female sawflies that cause the leaf-rolling by injecting chemicals as they lay their eggs.
If the farmer chooses a nonresistant variety and the spring emergence of adult sawflies is large, there is only a 1- to 2-week period in which to spray insecticides.
Conifer sawflies (Hymenoptera: Diprionidae) comprise the major folivore group exploiting P.
Galling sawflies (Hymenoptera: Tenthredinidae) are usually strictly monophagous and show delicate control of their oviposition behavior (Benson, 1958; Vikberg, 1970).