Saxe-Meiningen


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Saxe-Meiningen

(săks-mīn`ĭng-ən), Ger. Sachsen-Meiningen, former duchy, Thuringia, central Germany. The capital was MeiningenMeiningen
, city (1994 pop. 24,589), Thuringia, E central Germany, on the Werra River. Manufactures include textiles, paper, and metal products; there is an industry in railway repair. Meiningen was first mentioned in the 10th cent. and passed to the dukes of Saxony in 1583.
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. A possession of the Ernestine branch of the house of WettinWettin
, German dynasty, which ruled in Saxony, Thuringia, Poland, Great Britain, Belgium, and Bulgaria. It takes its name from a castle on the Saale near Halle. The family gained prominence in the 10th cent.
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, it became a separate duchy in 1681 under Bernard, third son of Ernest the Pious of Saxe-GothaSaxe-Gotha
, Ger. Sachsen-Gotha, former duchy, Thuringia, central Germany. A possession of the Ernestine branch of the house of Wettin, it passed in the 16th cent. to the dukes of Saxe-Weimar.
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. In the dynastic rearrangement that followed the extinction (1825) of the male line of Saxe-Gotha, the duke of Saxe-Meiningen received (1826) Saxe-Saalfeld from the duke of Saxe-Coburg (who obtained Gotha instead) and Saxe-Hildburghausen (whose duke was compensated with Saxe-AltenburgSaxe-Altenburg
, Ger. Sachsen-Altenburg, former duchy, Thuringia, central Germany. Altenburg was the capital. Created a separate duchy in 1603, it was ruled by an Ernestine line of the house of Wettin.
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). Saxe-Meiningen sided (1866) with Austria in the Austro-Prussian War. The last duke abdicated in 1918, and in 1920 Saxe-Meiningen was incorporated into Thuringia. For the theatrical company organized by Duke George II of Saxe-Meiningen, see Meiningen PlayersMeiningen Players,
German theatrical company that toured Europe from 1874 to 1890. The group, inspiring theatrical reforms wherever it performed, was a major influence in the movement toward modern theater.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Glen Wilson); Professor Pepper's ghost, George Speaight; Erasing the spectator: observations on nineteenth century lighting, Victor Emeljanow; Art in the theatre: I-scenery, William Telbin; Art in the theatre: the painting of scenery, William Telbin; Art in the theatre: spectacle, Augustus Harris; From political to cultural despotism: the nature of the Saxe-Meiningen aesthetic, John Osborne.
Ulrike Gleixner considers further altruistic practices of noblewomen, through a study of Elisabeth of Saxe-Meiningen, an eighteenth-century Princess Abbess, who not only encouraged great cultural and musical development in her territory, but also funded religious foundations, as well as Protestant missions to India.
A paragraph on the Duke of Saxe-Meiningen and a mention of Oscar Schlemmer's Triadic Ballet from the Bauhaus era are the only real references to progression in costume design.
Such was the sentiment behind Saxe-Meiningen League's declaration that its purposes were not only to "defend Protestant interests in all respects against the growing power of Rome" but also to "strengthen Protestant community awareness.
One of the most interesting essays in this collection is by Ann Marie Koller, who (following Hill's argument) suggests that the great stage director the Duke of Saxe-Meiningen attended Aldridge's performance and was so impressed by the actor's authenticity that he was inspired to initiate his famed quest for stage naturalism.
She cites my mention of the Duke of Saxe-Meiningen as evidence, but all I do is bring him up as a historical reference point--I neither laud nor criticize him.