Saxhorn


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Related to Saxhorn: saxtuba

Saxhorn

 

any one of a family of wind instruments with mouthpieces, devised by A. Sax. Saxhorns are distinguished by their uniform dimensions and shape (similar to that of a tuba). The saxhorn family originally numbered seven members; it later included nine instruments, ranging from the sopranino to the subcontrabass. Saxhorns are often designated alto, tenor and baritone, which are the three varieties of most brass instruments.

References in periodicals archive ?
The next saxhorn in descending order is the alto in E[flat], used in both Berlioz's and d'Indy's ensembles, although unlike d'Indy (who does call it "saxhorn alto"), Berlioz actually names it a "saxhorn tenor en Mi-flat." This is otherwise unknown in orchestral literature, but corresponds closely with the althorn, an instrument known in military or brass band circles where it often replaces the French horn as an "upright grand." It transposes a major sixth down.
Tuba Blues, pour tuba en ut, saxhorn si[??], ou euphonium et piano.
This is probably the tradition Sax was following when he called his instrument the alto Saxhorn. It is also possible that he referred to it as a tenor saxhorn when he was considering the three-foot long E[??] instrument as the soprano.
The performance is by the Dodworth Saxhorn Band, formed in 1985, and here conducted by Paul Eachus.
Premieres variations, pour euphonium ou saxhorn basse en ut ou en si[MUSICAL NOTES NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] ou tuba en ut et piano.
Unfortunately, conservatories did not as yet have permanent teachers of band instrumentation, so while the graduates may have been technically prepared, they had little practical knowledge, especially with regard to new instruments such as saxhorns, saxophones, and lower brass.
Patterned after the Canadian village and factory bands of the turn of the previous century, the "Plumbing Factory Brass Band" is the successor to my pre-Confederation era re-enactment groups that used obsolete instruments such as over-the-shoulder saxhorns and keyed bugle.
Numerous firms, including Moritz, Sax, Cerveny, and Alexander, supplied military bands with valved instruments of the type now known as saxhorns. Wagner knew about them, but was not satisfied with the sound.
Among the instruments that you might see me regularly performing on are jazz trumpet, flugelhorn, and cornet; classical trumpet (including B[flat], C, D/E[flat], and piccolo trumpets); valve trombone; anachronistic instruments such as Civil War E[flat] and B[flat] cornets, E[flat] and B[flat] keyed bugles; and such oddities as over the-shoulder Saxhorns, Schreiberhorns,* and rotary valve solo altos.
The 13 chapters (plus bibliography and indices for instruments, makers, people and places, and general information) cover the following topics: Seaweed, Bark, Cane, and Gourd; Side-blown Horns; Shell Trumpets; Shorter End-blown Trumpets and Horns; Longer End-blown Trumpets; "Orchestral" Trumpets and Slide Trombones; "Orchestral" Natural Horns; Valved Horns, Trumpets, and Trombones; Bugles and Cornets [including flugelhorns, alto, tenor and baritone horns, euphoniums, tubas, saxhorns, etc.]; Fingerhole Horns [cornettos to ophicleides]; Accessories [mouthpieces, mutes, lyres, shanks, lubricants, cleaners, tools]; The Technology of Brass Instruments [the process of making instruments, including materials and shaping processes]; Playing [producing sounds, factors in tone, acoustics].