Scanderbeg


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Scanderbeg

or

Skanderbeg

(both: skăn`dərbĕg), c.1404–1468, Albanian national hero. His original name was George Castriota or Kastriotes, but the Ottomans called him Iskender Bey, and this was corrupted into Scanderbeg. The son of a prince of N Albania, he was educated in the Muslim faith as a hostage at the court of Sultan Murad IIMurad II,
1403–51, Ottoman sultan (1421–51), son and successor of Muhammad I to the throne of the Ottoman Empire (Turkey). He was opposed at his accession by a pretender, Mustafa, who rapidly gained control over most of the Ottoman possessions in Europe.
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. The sultan showered favors on him and gave him the title bey and an army command. In 1443, when the Ottomans indicated they would attack Albania, Scanderbeg escaped to his homeland, abjured Islam, and formed a league of princes among the Albanian chieftains. He proclaimed himself prince of Albania. To resist the Ottomans under Sultan Muhammad IIMuhammad II
or Mehmet II
(Muhammad the Conqueror), 1429–81, Ottoman sultan (1451–81), son and successor of Murad II. He is considered the true founder of the Ottoman Empire (Turkey).
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, Scanderbeg received aid at various times from Venice, Naples, Hungary, and the pope. He had success in these wars partly because of the rugged Albanian terrain and partly because he employed a mobile defense force using guerrilla methods. He withstood repeated attacks and forced the sultan to conclude a 10-year truce in 1461. Scanderbeg broke the truce in 1463 when Pope Pius II called for a new crusade. The pope's death (1464) forced abandonment of the crusade; Scanderbeg, left without allies, had to retreat to his fortress of Kroia. After his death the league dissolved, resistance collapsed, and Albania fell to the Ottomans. Scanderbeg's life is the source of many Albanian tales.
References in periodicals archive ?
In a recent article, David McInnis persuasively suggests that Oxford's players' George Scanderbeg may have represented yet another attempt by a rival company to capitalize on the success of Tamburlaine.
Here, however, the fissures in the rhetoric are apparent, and the vaunting style is revealed as hollow boasting: Higgen ultimately refuses to fight for Penia, leaving her to cry despairingly, "Higgen, Scanderbeg, Tamberlain, grand Captain Higgen" (23), recalling Higgen's martial bravado even as it is revealed to be a charade.
The fourteen lines of the Scanderbeg exemplum revolve around verse 193 which divides the episode into two equal parts, the hero's abduction and indoctrination (187-92) and his rebellion (194-200):
Embarrassed by his failure, Bevilacqua sees his further attempts to "honor" their culture derided when he is criticized and booed at the christening of a bronze statue representing the Arberesh hero, Scanderbeg, in the town's main square.
The glorification of Scanderbeg as the national hero of the Albanians epitomizes this shift from religion to ethnicity.
17) A lost play about George Scanderbeg, entered in the Stationers' Register in July 1601, may be even more relevant: Scanderbeg, a renegade Christian, led Turkish armies against Christians, and Othello could have been written as a counter-attraction, with a Moor starring as a Christian general against the Turks.
Scanderbeg died in 1468, and Albania remained independent until a second Ottoman conquest in 1478.
E penso per esempio a uno scrittore come Carmine Abate, che elabora letterariamente, e con libri di successo, la propria identita linguistica arberesh con Il ballo tondo, La moto di Scanderbeg, La festa del ritorno e Il mosaico del tempo grande.