Scarpia

Scarpia

offers mock execution for Tosca’s affections. [Ital. Opera: Puccini, Tosca, Westerman, 352–354]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Dream roles include Marcello, Wotan, the Dutchman, and Scarpia although Keoughan realizes he "still has a good ten years before those are realistic." Keoughan's favourite roles are buffo ones because he is "naturally a goof," but the most rewarding role he's performed thus far is the mentally tortured Pink." It is definitely an intimidating role as I never stop singing nor leave the stage throughout the entire piece, But, oh my!
The role of Scarpia will be performed by the soloist of the Belarus Academic Opera and Ballet Theater Vladimir Gromov.
Internationally renowned baritone Nicholas Folwell will make his MWO debut in the role of Scarpia. He first studied the role as a student in the early 1970s with renowned teacher Raimund Herincx.
One of the central characters is the ruthless chief of police Baron Scarpia who uses his position of authority to coerce Tosca into bed.
The cast of "Tosca" will feature Ukrainian dramatic soprano Tetyana Torzhevska of Huntley in the leading role of Floria Tosca; tenor Simon Kyung Lee of Chicago as Mario Cavaradossi, the painter; and Metropolitan Opera baritone William Powers of Barrington in the role of Scarpia, the chief of police.
Scarpia tricks Tosca into going to Cavaradossi's house, and has other officers follow her.
Events unfold as Baron Scarpia, chief of the secret police realizes that Cavaradossi has offered help to the prisoner and a struggle ensues between Tosca and Scarpia to save Cavardossi from execution.
The last of the original leads, bass-baritone Bryn Terfel, who had been set to play the villain, Scarpia, left the production soon after arriving for rehearsals this month, saying he had been forced to "rest due to vocal fatigue".
The bass-baritone was due to take the role of Scarpia in the New York Metropolitan Opera's staging of Puccini's Tosca, which opens on New Year's Eve.
Playing against them was Craig Smith as Baron Scarpia: a gaunt, pale figure with a malevolently beady stare, and harsh, cool singing (he almost barked as his temper frayed) to match.
He uses leitmotifs in a similar way to Wagner as the mention of three central figures, Scarpia, Tosca, and Cavaradossi.