scene

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scene

1. 
a. a subdivision of an act of a play, in which the time is continuous and the setting fixed
b. a single event, esp a significant one, in a play
2. Films a shot or series of shots that constitutes a unit of the action
3. the backcloths, stage setting, etc., for a play or film set; scenery
References in classic literature ?
Lucy returned to the stage for her scenes in the second act (the last in which she appears) with Sir Lucius and Fag.
Lucy's two telling scenes, at the end of the first and second acts, were sufficiently removed from the scenes in which Julia appeared to give time for the necessary transformations in dress.
Among these traditions were the disregard for unity, partly of action, but especially of time and place; the mingling of comedy with even the intensest scenes of tragedy; the nearly complete lack of stage scenery, with a resultant willingness in the audience to make the largest possible imaginative assumptions; the presence of certain stock figures, such as the clown; and the presentation of women's parts by men and boys.
I remained in a recess of the rock, gazing on this wonderful and stupendous scene.
It describes in elaborate detail what it terms a "terrestrial paradise," and closes with the startling information that this paradise is "a scene of desolation and misery.
Here is a scene in the vaults of the palace,' he began.
She had read and read the scene again with many painful, many wondering emotions, and looked forward to their representation of it as a circumstance almost too interesting.
Against this wall stood a large discarded scene from the ROI DE LAHORE.
The next scene was a puzzler, for in came another animal, on all-fours this time, with a new sort of tail and long ears.
This introduced the most brilliant, worldly, the most enchantingly gay scene I had ever looked upon.
His quick eye took in the whole scene with a single comprehending glance and stopped upon the figure of a woman standing facing a great lion across the carcass of a horse.
I must have one pathetic scene in it," said Anne thoughtfully.