Schelling, Thomas Crombie

Schelling, Thomas Crombie,

1921–2016, American economist and political scientist, b. Oakland, Calif., Ph.D. Harvard, 1951. He worked in the federal government before teaching at Yale (1953–58), Harvard (1958–90), and the Univ. of Maryland (1990–2003; emeritus from 2003). Schelling employed game theory (see games, theory ofgames, theory of,
group of mathematical theories first developed by John Von Neumann and Oskar Morgenstern. A game consists of a set of rules governing a competitive situation in which from two to n
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) to understand military strategy, the nuclear arms race, and arms control, setting forth his insights in such works as The Strategy of Conflict (1960) and Arms and Influence (1966). He also studied the dynamics involved in racial segregation, formalizing the concept of the tipping point to explain "white flight," and the danger of global climate change among other topics. In 2005 he shared the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences with Robert AumannAumann, Robert John,
American-Israeli mathematician, b. Frankfurt, Germany, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1955. He immigrated with his family to the United States in 1938, and moved to Israel in 1956, where he has taught at the Hebrew Univ.
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 for enhancing the understanding of conflict and cooperation through their work on game theory.

Schelling, Thomas Crombie

(1921–  ) economist; born in Oakland, Calif. He was a U.S. government economist (1948–53) and a professor at Yale (1953–58) before becoming the Lucius N. Litauer Professor of Political Economics at Harvard. The diverse subjects of his teaching and writing include arms control, crime, and business ethics. His analysis of economic policy in such areas as energy, environmental protection, and nuclear capabilities is widely respected.