Schelling

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Schelling

Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph von . 1775--1854, German philosopher. He expanded Fichte's idea that there is one reality, the infinite and absolute Ego, by regarding nature as an absolute being working towards self-consciousness. His works include Ideas towards a Philosophy of Nature (1797) and System of Transcendental Idealism (1800)
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In the concluding section, I will present a reconstruction of the Schellingian ideas presented here alongside some of my own.
Here I argue several points: (1) Schellingian resonances detectable in Rahner's symbol essay indicate his continued engagement with Schelling's essay on human freedom long after he studied it with Heidegger.
He asserts that an abyssal confrontation with death is "of all things the most dreadful" and thus "requires the greatest strength"; yet, being weak, "Beauty hates the Understanding for asking of her what it cannot do." We then hear from Hegel about how true Geist would strive patiently to transform the negative and not behave--the words recalling Schelling's once more--"as when we say of something that it is nothing or is false, and then, having done with it, turn away and pass on to something else." (29) This comment is astounding in its use of Schelling's own insight to demolish Novalis's thoughts on mortality even as another remark a few pages before has set up the Romantic night to mock Schellingian philosophy.
This "collective self-binding" is not only a Schellingian "solution" to the problem of collective action; it is also a way of "encouraging future citizens to think for themselves" (pp.
Yet, arguably, this is not 'difference' but the worst form of Schellingian identity (or indifference) in which the world and art are no longer discernible.
In genuine Schellingian enthusiasm Tuschling has concluded that the enigmatic titles quoted above refer not to Fichte's Doctrine of Science but to Schelling's Abhandlungen zur Erlauterung des Idealismus der Wissenschaftslehre (1796-97).
In order to interpret Afanas'ev accurately, we must have some knowledge of the Russian theological environment out of which he emerged, and Nichols provides a good survey of the entire development of Russian theology up to the beginning of this century in his opening chapter, underlining the distinctive mixture of patristic learning and sub-Hegelian (or Schellingian) metaphysics that generated the characteristically Russian perspective on ecclesiology from about 1850 to 1930.
Is it necessary to say that, opposition to machinism was more readily generated in the theatre of the social and more difficult (after the initial Schellingian flourish at least) in the natural world (let's say for a good century from the mid-19th to the late 20th).
(3) A's treatment of Don Giovanni accordingly alternates between brandishing the ponderous categories of Hegelian and Schellingian aesthetics in a show of dialectical irrefutability, and avowing--within a section deprecatingly labeled "Insignificant Introduction"--that such devices are inadequate to what he calls his lyrical thought, (4) flimsy justifications of the fact that he is so fully besotted with the opera that he owes his entire life's meaning to it.
In short, once we learn to tell and learn from the universe story, we are poised to fulfill our unique vocation: "to enable this entire community to reflect on and to celebrate itself and its deepest mystery in a special mode of conscious self-awareness." (50) If one replaces the language of cosmos with that of "the Absolute" or "Spirit," then we would have a classically Hegelian, or perhaps Schellingian formula: we are finite concretions of infinite Spirit, objectified in the cosmos, but now also on the verge of becoming conscious of itself.
We are shown his role as a teacher who influenced a generation of thinkers, several of them Jews who attended his Munich lectures and later went on to Rabbinical positions and incorporated Schellingian ideas into their own theological and philosophical exploits, and his role as a student of cabbalistic ideas (chiefly the writings of the 'Christian' cabbalist Franz Josef Molitor) is discussed.
Based on Peirce's own claims to be a 'Schellingian of some stripe', Gare sees Schelling's influence in Peirce's efforts to similarly overcome the static and mechanical view of the world which emerged with the Moderate Enlightenment, '...