Schengen Agreement

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Schengen Agreement

(shĕng`ən), agreement signed in 1985 in Schengen, Luxembourg, by several European Community (now the European UnionEuropean Union
(EU), name given since the ratification (Nov., 1993) of the Treaty of European Union, or Maastricht Treaty, to the European Community (EC), an economic and political confederation of European nations, and other organizations (with the same member nations)
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; EU) to establish a mutual visa policy that would permit free movement among them. It was followed (1990) by the Schengen Convention, which allowed for implementation of the agreement; full implementation began (1995) with seven countries. The Schengen Area now consists of 26 mostly EU countries; Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway, and Switzerland are also participants. A 2020 agreement calls for Gibraltar to participate as well. EU members Ireland and the United Kingdom chose not join the Schengen Area; EU members Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, and Romania are required to eventually join. With the implementation of Schengen, the EU's external border control agency, Frontex, was strengthened. In 2015, as hundreds of thousands of Middle Eastern and North African refugees and migrants arrived in Europe by land and sea, several Schengen countries reestablished border controls; border checks continued into 2017. The COVID-19 pandemic led EU nations to restrict travel for a time in 2020 to control the disease's spread.
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The post EU agrees to extend border controls inside Schengen zone appeared first on Cyprus Mail .
Europe would face enormous annual costs and trade damage by restoring border controls among 26 countries in Schengen zone, Rand study suggests
Currently British passport-holders can travel throughout member states without having to apply for shortterm visas, but Britain's decision to leave the EU has left question marks over the criteria needed for UK nationals to visit the Schengen zone. According to The Guardian, the European Commission (EC) is due to unveil draft legislation for the EU travel information and authorisation system (Etias) later this year as part of a broader response to calls for greater security across the continent following recent terror attacks in France and Belgium.
Currently, the Schengen Zone includes 25 countries as well as Iceland, Norway and Switzerland, that remain outside of the EU but part of the visa-free Schengen Zone.
As an EU country, and part of the Schengen Zone, that includes the right to travel and work, visa free, to any of the other Schengen countries.
Furthermore, while the bond confers to the applicant and his or her family a lifelong visa-free entry to any of the Schengen Zone countries, other benefits include zero personal income tax being levied and the eligibility to apply for Hungarian citizenship after eight years.
The uncertainty is attributed to a number of grey or black swan events including the long predicted slowdown of China's economic growth and the greatest migration to Europe for a century across a fragile Schengen zone.
The head of state said that all those involved in the crisis management system responsible to handle the situation informed at the meeting about the illegal migration threats coming from the territory of the European Union and the Schengen zone and about the possibilities of the situation worsening further.
Denmark will extend its temporary border controls within the Schengen zone until at least March 4, Minister for Immigration, Integration and Housing Inger Stojberg said Tuesday, local Danish media reported.
When asked whether freedom of travel in the Schengen zone is in danger, he replied, "I hope not, but I can see the risk."
The German chancellor's sudden move in early September to welcome asylum seekers from Syria opened bitter rifts in the EU and raised fears for the future of the passport-free Schengen zone.