schistosity


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schistosity

[shis′täs·əd·ē]
(geology)
A type of cleavage characteristic of metamorphic rocks, notably schists and phyllites, in which the rocks tend to split along parallel planes defined by the distribution and parallel arrangement of platy mineral crystals.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is characterized by a strong southward-dipping schistosity and is bounded on both sides by southward-dipping faults, which Sutherland-Brown and Robinson (1971) suggest are en-echelon in character.
One of the prime characteristics of schist is its schistosity, or its micaceous cleavage which means that it readily breaks into sheets.
8), since the conductive minerals that are oriented according to the schistosity plane offer targets to the radar wave reflection.
Oil shales of the field are brown, gray and greenish, and they display distinct lamination and schistosity. On the basis of drilling data, thickness of the oil shale sequence is 8.5-50 m.
Eastern regions, where structural fabrics (stratification and schistosity) are east-striking, record large-scale Na-K losses along with very strong local-scale K-gain zones; these patterns have been interpreted as representing a volcanogenic footprint [30].
Various discontinuities such as tectonic joints, schistosity and cleavage planes were developed in these rocks and can cause rock slope instability, especially on the margin of the Ganjnameh-Shahrestaneh road.
In amphibolites the hornblendes are interlayered with plagioclase defining clear schistosity (Fig.
The regional foliation is mostly a schistosity (S2) defined by the alternance of quartz and chlorite+white-mica bands (Fig.
An analysis of the beds spatial location made by instrumental methods within the SG-3 Proterozoic and Archaean sections shows that the inclination of the structural elements (layering, schistosity, banding) about the borehole axis ranges from 40[degrees] to 60[degrees], Figure 1.