Schmidt camera


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Schmidt camera

[′shmit ‚kam·rə]
(optics)
References in periodicals archive ?
Historically, one way of achieving this had been the Schmidt camera design of telescope, invented by Bernard Schmidt in 1930 and notably adopted by the 48-inch Samuel Oschin Schmidt Telescope used for the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey in 1949-'58.
In the Schmidt camera configuration, however, there was no such extension, and the sensor within any given camera needed to be finely positioned within the narrow focal range of the instrument by means of its own specific adaptor.
Once a telescope had been converted for use with HyperStar, it was relatively straightforward to switch it between the SCT and Schmidt camera configurations; the process took perhaps a few minutes in a well-lit room.
Having a fast focal ratio meant that the Schmidt camera configuration had a very small depth of focus--i.e.
In common with SCTs, Schmidt cameras brought light to a focus using a catadioptric combination of a refracting corrector plate followed by a spherical short-focal-length primary mirror.
Full-aperture objective prisms on Schmidt cameras have proven a powerful survey tool, as in searches for quasars and the automated spectral typing of stars.
To date, about 20 Schmidt cameras have been completed, two thirds of them in the United States.
"What kind of work is being done with Schmidt cameras? Dr.
The Rowe-Ackermann Schmidt Astrograph is a modern reworking of the classic 5.5- and 8-inch Schmidt cameras Celestron produced in the 1970s and '80s.
www.celestron.com Celestron unveiled the Rowe-Ackermann f/2.2 Schmidt Astrograph, which is a 21st-century optical update of Celestron's Schmidt cameras from the film era.
By the close of the '70s, Celestron's product line boasted Schmidt- and Maksutov-Cassegrain telescopes, spotting scopes, telephoto lenses, Schmidt cameras, binoculars, and scores of accessories.
Apart from the topic of camera lenses, about the only time anyone mentions "f/2" and "astrophotography" in the same sentence is when they're talking about Schmidt cameras. And that turns out to be a pretty good analogy for HyperStar.