Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope


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Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope

[′shmit kas·gran ′tel·ə‚skōp]
(optics)
A variant of the Schmidt system which uses a Schmidt corrector plate together with a pair of spheroidal or slightly aspherical mirrors arranged as in a Cassegrain telescope.
References in periodicals archive ?
Contributing Editor ROD MOLLISE is a well-known expert on all aspects of Schmidt-Cassegrain telescopes.
FORK-MOUNTED Schmidt-Cassegrain telescopes have been around for more than half a century.
At first they considered an 8-inch Celestron, but later opted for the increased aperture of Celestron's 9.25-inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope. Because of WORF's limited dimensions, however, the larger scope's mount and fork arms were not the right size for aligning the telescope's optical axis with the center of the window.
Details: Celestron EdgeHD14 Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope with QHY5L-II video camera.
I got an education about dew shortly after I bought my 8-inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope in 1976.
Details: 12-inch Meade LX 90 Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope at f/6.3 with Canon EOS Rebel T3i DSLR camera.
Details: Celestron C14 Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope with ZWO Design ASI120MM video camera.
Corrector plates happen to work particularly well with the Cassegrain design; indeed, Schmidt-Cassegrain Telescopes (SCTs) and Maksutov-Cassegrain Telescopes (Maks) are wildly popular, while classic Cassegrains (with no corrector plate) are relatively rare.
By contrast, the trend now was that many astrophotographers preferred small aperture refractors on account of their high quality optics, though others still used Schmidt-Cassegrain telescopes. For several years, film photography had been entirely superseded by digital imaging, using either digital SLR cameras or dedicated astronomical CCDs, on account of the more immediate feedback provided by the new devices, together with their improved linearity and quantum efficiency--i.e.
Fork-mounted Schmidt-Cassegrain telescopes have long been a mainstay in the amateur market, offering portability and generous aperture in a compact package.
Both Martin Mobberley's and Paul Downing's images were obtained through 35cm Celestron C14 Schmidt-Cassegrain telescopes, Paul's from his observatory in southern Spain and Martin's from his in Cockfield, Suffolk.