Schoolhouse

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Schoolhouse

A building used for a school, especially an elementary school.

schoolhouse

A building in which classes are conducted at different educational levels for students up to college age. Also see one-room schoolhouse.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some of the now-closed schoolhouses continued as the social centres of their communities.
Americans do not seek the accuracy provided by Gulliford or Stuttgen in their interactions with the past, and the realities are forgotten; visitors to surviving schoolhouses or those who see an image of a country school do not seek authenticity.
Brewer, D-Barre, announces grant money for the restoration of one-room schoolhouses in Barre and Petersham from inside District School House No.
For the Washington school district, addressing those environmental concerns was a core focus even before it became the beneficiary of the inaugural Green Schoolhouses.
By 1878, the district included eight schoolhouses and 17 teachers.
In the 1960s and 1970s entry-level training in the Navy was accomplished primarily by lectures presented at schoolhouses, using visual aids--largely created manually--such as 35-mm slides for carousel projectors and film strips.
Our schoolhouse, along with a very interesting write-up by a previous school-teacher Betty Havard Taylor who taught there from 1935-1937, is featured in the recently published book, Days to Remember--One-room Schoolhouses in the Eastern Township, published by the Canadian Federation of University Women, Sherbrooke & District.
But once all of this was done and communities began to grow, small schoolhouses were constructed.
A fitting memorial to those vintage Minnesota schoolhouses that served to educate a rural population, these photographs take on an almost poetic and most certainly iconic quality as the reader browses from page to page.
Homemaker visits two former schoolhouses which have come onto the property market.
When the government delivered the revolutionary imperative of formal education, this singularly yanked Inuit life to start revolving around the locations of the schoolhouses.
At the heart of his story is an analysis of the shift from one-room schoolhouses - periodically attended, poorly equipped and ruled by rote learning and threat of punishment - to graded schools with regular semesters, individualized programs of learning, and fear of failure as keeper of discipline.