schooner

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schooner

(sko͞o`nər), sailing vessel, rigged fore-and-aft, with from two to seven masts. Schooners can lie closer to the wind than square-rigged sailing ships, need a smaller crew, and are very fast. They were first constructed in colonial America and because of their speed became one of the favorite craft of the United States and Canada in the latter half of the 18th cent. and the first half of the 19th cent. Schooners were widely used in the North Atlantic fisheries and the North American coastal trade until World War I, when they were replaced by power-driven craft.

Bibliography

See H. I. Chapelle, The History of American Sailing Ships (1935); J. F. Leavitt, Wake of the Coasters (1970); N. Haley, The Schooner Era (1972).

Schooner

 

a fore-and-aft rigged vessel with at least two masts. With displacements of 100 to 5,000 tons, schooners are used as cargo, fishing, sport, and training vessels. Most modern schooners are equipped with internal-combustion engines, which enable them to travel during calm weather and in narrow fairways. The barkentine and the brigantine are special types of schooners.

schooner

[′skün·ər]
(naval architecture)
A sailing vessel with two or more masts rigged fore and aft.

schooner

a sailing vessel with at least two masts, with all lower sails rigged fore-and-aft, and with the main mast stepped aft
References in classic literature ?
A sailor, in the main rigging, carried away a ratline in both hands, fell head-downward, and was clutched by an ankle and saved head-downward by a comrade, as the schooner cracked and shuddered, uplifted on the port side, and was flung down on her starboard side till the ocean poured level over her rail.
Here she comes again, and the schooner ain't built that'd stand such hammering."
Mauki was sorely frightened when they brought him on board the schooner. He was a lamb led to the slaughter.
A little red dory, labelled Hattie S., lay astern of the schooner. Dan hauled in the painter, and dropped lightly on to the bottom boards, while Harvey tumbled clumsily after.
And I sent a schooner clear to Hawaii to bring back a dismantled sugar mill and a German who said he knew the field-end of cane.
The roll of thunder came near, crashed over us; the schooner trembled, and the great voice went on, threatening terribly, into the distance.
By this time the schooner and her little consort were gliding pretty swiftly through the water; indeed, we had already fetched up level with the camp-fire.
Then I realized that I was in that little hell of mine again, now half swamped; and looking back over the gunwale, I saw the schooner standing away from me, with the red-haired captain mocking at me over the taffrail, and turning towards the island saw the launch growing smaller as she approached the beach.
During the night, while the oyster pirates lay stupefied in their bunks, the schooner and the Reindeer floated on the high water and swung about to their anchors.
And all the while, rolling, plunging, climbing the moving mountains and falling and wallowing in the foaming valleys, the schooner Ghost was fighting her way farther and farther into the heart of the Pacific--and I was on her.
She had felt entirely at ease in his society from the first evening that she had met him, and their acquaintance had grown to a very sensible friendship by the time of the departure of the Ithaca--the rechristened schooner which was to carry them away to an unguessed fate.
At any rate, the schooner will take over the Jessie's business.