schooner

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schooner

(sko͞o`nər), sailing vessel, rigged fore-and-aft, with from two to seven masts. Schooners can lie closer to the wind than square-rigged sailing ships, need a smaller crew, and are very fast. They were first constructed in colonial America and because of their speed became one of the favorite craft of the United States and Canada in the latter half of the 18th cent. and the first half of the 19th cent. Schooners were widely used in the North Atlantic fisheries and the North American coastal trade until World War I, when they were replaced by power-driven craft.

Bibliography

See H. I. Chapelle, The History of American Sailing Ships (1935); J. F. Leavitt, Wake of the Coasters (1970); N. Haley, The Schooner Era (1972).

Schooner

 

a fore-and-aft rigged vessel with at least two masts. With displacements of 100 to 5,000 tons, schooners are used as cargo, fishing, sport, and training vessels. Most modern schooners are equipped with internal-combustion engines, which enable them to travel during calm weather and in narrow fairways. The barkentine and the brigantine are special types of schooners.

schooner

[′skün·ər]
(naval architecture)
A sailing vessel with two or more masts rigged fore and aft.

schooner

a sailing vessel with at least two masts, with all lower sails rigged fore-and-aft, and with the main mast stepped aft
References in classic literature ?
The schooner Fair American, commanded by his son, following in his track, had fallen into the hands of the natives to the southward of Tocaigh Bay, and young Metcalf and four of the crew had been massacred.
And, indeed, to a landsman the nodding schooners around seemed run from the same mould.
The three men stepped outside in time to see the two schooners go hastily about and head off shore, dropping mainsails and flying jibs on the run in the teeth of the squall that heeled them far over on the whitened water.
My captains made faster runs than ever and earned bigger bonuses, as did my supercargoes, who saw to it that my schooners did not loaf and dawdle along the way.
And I was going to sea myself, to sea in a schooner, with a piping boatswain and pig-tailed singing seamen, to sea, bound for an unknown island, and to seek for buried treasure!
Before long the searchlight discovered some distance away a schooner with all sails set, apparently the same vessel which had been noticed earlier in the evening.
At anchor a schooner looks better; she has an aspect of greater efficiency and a better balance to the eye, with her two masts distributed over the hull with a swaggering rake aft.
We shipped them aboard the Duque de Mondejo's yacht Braganza; the schooner Spindrift had disappeared from the face of the waters for ever.
Such time as he could find from the many duties which had devolved upon him in the matter of obtaining and outfitting the schooner, and signing her two mates and crew of fifteen, had been spent with his employer's daughter.
Maybe Jessie, maybe other fella schooner," came the faltering admission.
White marster along schooner plenty friend along me too much.
I had glanced occasionally at the approaching schooner, and it was now almost abreast of us and not more than a couple of hundred yards away.