Schwartz, Arthur

Schwartz, Arthur

(1900–84) composer; born in New York City. While practicing law in the mid-1920s, he began selling songs to vaudeville and Broadway revues. In the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s he collaborated for Broadway, mainly with lyricist Howard Dietz, and worked as a Hollywood producer and composer with such lyricists as Dorothy Fields and Ira Gershwin on musicals, revues, films, and television. One of his best-known melodies is that for "You and the Night and the Music," and with Dietz he wrote the show-business standard, "That's Entertainment" (1953). From 1958 to 1983 he was director of ASCAP (American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers).
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His major work of criticism, After the Revolution, concerns "non-Jewish Jews," Jewish-American writers born between 1915 and 1933, including Bellow, Malamud, Roth, Mailer, Isaac Rosenfeld, and Allen Ginsberg, with glances at Delmore Schwartz, Arthur Miller, Paul Goodman, Alfred Kazin, Irving Howe, and Lionel Trilling.