Scolopendromorpha

Scolopendromorpha

[¦skäl·ə‚pen·drə′mȯr·fə]
(invertebrate zoology)
An order of the chilopod subclass Pleurostigmophora containing the dominant tropical forms, and also the largest of the centipedes.

Scolopendromorpha

 

an order of arthropods of the class Chilopoda. The flat body is about 30 cm long and is divided into a head and trunk, consisting of 25 to 29 segments. The first body segment has a pair of powerful maxillipeds, whose distal joints are equipped with claws perforated by the opening of the poison gland, which is placed at the base of the joint. The remaining body segments each have one pair of walking legs. Insemination is by means of spermatophores. The female protects the eggs and hatched young by rolling herself into a ball around them.

The Scolopendromorpha occur mostly in the tropics. In the USSR they are found only in the Crimea, the Caucasus, the southern Ukraine, southern Ciscaucasia, and Middle Asia. Nocturnal animals, the arthropods stay in sheltered places during the day, for example, under rocks or in cracks in the soil. They are active predators that feed on insects, earthworms, and other invertebrates. Large species also attack toads, lizards, and birds. The arthropods are poisonous; the sting of some tropical species is fatal to man. Species of the family Cryptopidae, which occur in the steppe zone, are not dangerous.

M. S. GILIAROV

References in periodicals archive ?
ATTACKS OF GIANT CENTIPED SCOLOPENDRA SUMICHRASTI SAUSSURE, 1860 (SCOLOPENDROMORPHA: SCOLOPENDRIDAE) OVER BAT NATALUS MEXICANUS MILLER, 1902 (CHIROPTERA: NATALIDAE) IN CHIAPAS, MEXICO
However, in addition to Opiliones, meaningful discoveries based on material from our collection also include: (1) "the spider that was an Acari" (Krantz & Platnick 1995), (2) the amazing Scolopendropsis duplicata Chagas-Jr., Edgecombe & Minelli, 2008, a new centipede from Tocantins State, central Brazil, whose discovery led to a revised diagnosis of the order Scolopendromorpha (Chagas-Jr.
The analysis of identification of 2336 prey items in 378 pellets collected shows that the species feeds on mainly invertabrates of the orders Insecta (92%), Pulmonata (1%), Haplotaxida (1%) and Scolopendromorpha (0.1%) and partly on vertebrates of the orders Rodentia (4%), Insectivora (1.3%) and Passeriformes (0.6%).
En general, los ordenes mas representativos en abundancia de individuos fueron Acari con 1648 individuos, Collembola con 336, Hemiptera con 310 y Coleoptera con 180, mientras que los de menor abundancia fueron Polyzoniida y Scolopendromorpha con 5 individuos cada uno, Lepidoptera con 3 individuos, y Geophilomorpha, Orthoptera y Thysanoptera con 1 individuo cada uno.
Since 1956, the adventive centipede Rhysida longipes longipes (Newport, 1845; Scolopendromorpha: Scolopendridae: Otostigminae) has been documented on 4 occasions from the South Florida counties Miami-Dade and Monroe (Chamberlin 1958; Crabill 1960; Shelley 2002; Shelley & Edwards 2004) with a 5th, unverified sighting likely representing this species (see Shelley & Edwards 2004 for detailed review).
Approximately 29 Orders of subterranean fauna were sampled in the Angelica cave, DSQm was the most efficient method for abundance in six of them (Amblypygi, Collembola, Orthoptera, Opiliones, Scolopendromorpha and Scutigeromorpha).
Macropredators recorded at our field site were centipedes [Lithobiomorpha (Bothropolys and Lithobius), Scolopendromorpha (Scolopocryptops sexspinosus) and Geophilomorpha], spiders [the largest and most abundant were amaurobiids (Wadotes)], beetles (Carabidae; the most abundant were Pterostichus stygicus which made up over 40% of the total each year).
To support the study and better understanding of the group, this paper provides a visual guide supported with descriptions of some characters from each family to determine the four orders (Scutigeromorpha, Lithobiomorpha, Scolopendromorpha and Geophilomorpha) and 16 families that occur in the country.
Rediscovery of the centipede, Scolopendra heros (Chilopoda: Scolopendromorpha: Scolopendridae) in southeastern Colorado.