Scombridae

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Scombridae

[′skäm·brə‚dē]
(vertebrate zoology)
A family of perciform fishes in the suborder Scombroidei including the mackerels and tunas.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Scombridae

 

(mackerels and tunas), a family of fishes of the order Perciformes. The body is elongated, spindle-shaped, and somewhat laterally compressed. The caudal peduncle is thin with three or, less commonly, two small thin ridges on each side; there are four to nine small additional fins above and beneath the caudal peduncle. The fishes have two dorsal fins; behind the second dorsal fin and the anal fins are small additional fins. The body is covered with small scales. In some species the posterior end of the body is scaleless, and the anterior part has large scales, which form a kind of carapace. The pectoral fins are situated high up.

There are about 15 genera, distributed in the tropical, subtropical, and, to some extent, temperate seas of the world ocean. The genera most commonly found in the waters of the USSR include Scomber (including the Atlantic mackerel), Sarda (including the Atlantic bonito), and Thunnus (tunas). Less frequently encountered are species of the genera Euthunnus, Katsuwonus, Auxis, and Scomberomorus.

Mackerels and tunas are rapid swimmers. They stay at substantial depths or near the surface. Most species are commercially valuable.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The importance of sampling with nets of different size during times of peak spawning when earliest stage larvae are most abundant was exemplified by the observed size distributions among sciaenid and scombrid larvae.
First records for the Bigeye Thresher (Alopias superciliosus) and Slender Tuna (Allothunnus fallai) from California, with notes on eastern Pacific scombrid otoliths.
Obvious mass deaths caused by contact or collisions have rarely been observed in any cultured fish except tunas--even in juvenile chub mackerel (Scomber japonicus), which, like the Pacific bluefin tuna, is a scombrid fish (Sawada, 2006).
Scombrid fishes are capable of high locomotory performance, including burst speeds from 18 body lengths per second (bl [s.sup.-1]) for mackerel (Wardle and He, 1988) to up to 27 bl [s.sup.-1] for tuna (Fierstine and Walters, 1968; also see Magnuson, 1978), and cruising speeds from 3.5 bl [s.sup.-1] for mackerel (Wardle and He, 1988) to 6-10 bl [s.sup.-1] for tuna (Yuen, 1970; summarized in Beamish, 1978).
Three species of scombrids were captured in the fishery, but most effort was with albacore.
Rearing, growth, and development of the eggs and larvae of seven scombrid fishes from the Straits of Florida.
Larvae of the genus Thunnus were sorted from other scombrid larvae by the morphological features and meristics described in Nishikawa and Rimmer (1987) and Ambrose (1996).
Scombrid fishes are considered to have adopted a survival strategy characterized by fast growth and the ability to consume large prey at an early age (Hunter, 1981).
Amongst scombrids, most of the catches were of Thunnus spp.