scripting language

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scripting language

[′skrip·tiŋ ‚laŋ·gwij]
(computer science)
An interpreted language (for example, JavaScript and Perl) used to write simple programs, called scripts.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

scripting language

(language)
(Or "glue language") A loose term for any language that is weakly typed or untyped and has little or no provision for complex data structures. A program in a scripting language (a "script") is often interpreted (but see Ousterhout's dichotomy).

Scripts typically interact either with other programs (often as glue) or with a set of functions provided by the interpreter, as with the file system functions provided in a UNIX shell and with Tcl's GUI functions. Prototypical scripting languages are AppleScript, C Shell, MS-DOS batch files and Tcl.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

scripting language

A high-level programming language that is interpreted (translated on the fly) rather than compiled ahead of time. A scripting language may be a general-purpose programming language or it may be limited to specific functions used to augment the running of an application or system program. For example, JavaScript is widely used on Web pages for calculations as well as for displaying messages, drop-down menus and other user interface elements. Perl, Tcl and Python are very comprehensive programming languages that are often called scripting languages.

Application Scripts
Microsoft's Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) is another example. A subset of Visual Basic, VBA is used to automate Microsoft Office applications. Many applications have their own limited-purpose scripting languages; for example, spreadsheets have macro languages, and communications programs (widely used for dial-up before the Web) and FTP programs generally support scripts for automating functions.

Command Line Scripts
Commands executed from the Windows, DOS or Unix/Linux command line are limited-purpose scripting languages, more often referred to as "command languages" (see command processor and shell script). See JavaScript, Perl, Tcl/Tk, Python, VBA, batch file abc's and Windows Script Host.
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References in periodicals archive ?
XMetaL Developer enables the enterprise to: build and configure productive authoring interfaces; use common scripting languages for faster configuration; and leverage an open architecture and standards-based approach that minimises developer learning curve, the company said.
Popular scripting languages include Perl[R], Python[R], VBScript[R], and JavaScript [R].
However, some projects that include scripting languages in generative programming appeared during last years.
It is true that the Web has no formalized structure or centralized organization other than the rules of the mark-up and scripting languages we use to write and design Web sites.
(Most CMS systems allow users to add to templates or add special features and applications.) Common scripting languages are ASP, PHP, JSP, and CFM.
Using Internet Explorer as the embedded web-browser, Serlient supports XML, CSS, various scripting languages and a host of other web technologies.
Such flexibility allows users to develop and deploy 4DX applications using a variety of programming and scripting languages within an MFC (Microsoft Foundation Class), .NET, or Java framework.
On the other hand, generative programming based on scripting languages is a relative new discipline.
Scripting languages are usually designed for writing small programs like batch files.
These new solutions are based their own scripting languages, development tools and methodologies, that facilitate Web application development.
It allows educators to create interactive content without having to learn programming code or scripting languages, and includes dozens of features for creating programs that run identically on Mac and Windows computers.