seashore

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seashore

the land between the marks of high and low water
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

seashore

[′sē‚shȯr]
(geology)
The strip of land that borders a sea or ocean. Also known as seaside; shore.
The ground between the usual tide levels. Also known as seastrand.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite numerous mentions in books and newspapers, there has been surprisingly little research into the non-monetary value of these gathering activities, particularly on the seashore.
Also at risk to higher seas are particular sections of the remaining two national seashores covered in the report: Cape Cod NS in Massachusetts and Cumberland Island NS in Georgia.
"Gulf Islands National Seashore can't handle another negative impact right now," says John Adornato, director of NPCA's Sun Coast regional office.
The quality of a National Park or National Seashore visit is increasingly overshadowed by statistics concerning the number of visitor-days each park or monument receives.
CAPE COD N.S., MASS.--The waters off Cape Cod National Seashore will be a little quieter and a little cleaner this summer, following a move by Massachusetts officials to approve ordinances banning personal watercraft use in four towns surrounding the seashore.
Dillon says there were 2,700 developed sites on the island when the seashore was established; now there are approximately 4, 000.
waters and which depend on seashores to nest--leatherback, green, loggerhead, hawksbill, and Kemp's ridley--are listed as either threatened or endangered.
From Maine to South Carolina, vehicle restrictions to protect plovers at national seashores and other beaches are now common.
"Our national seashores should be places where the public can escape the crowding of large cities and enjoy a pristine beach setting."
* March 2000: The Park Service bans PWCs in 66 of the 87 parks but gives 21 seashores, lakeshores, and recreation areas two years to establish regulations for PWC use; any unit that wants to allow PWC use after the grace period must complete environmental assessments and make special rules.