seashore

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seashore

the land between the marks of high and low water

seashore

[′sē‚shȯr]
(geology)
The strip of land that borders a sea or ocean. Also known as seaside; shore.
The ground between the usual tide levels. Also known as seastrand.
References in periodicals archive ?
Also at risk to higher seas are particular sections of the remaining two national seashores covered in the report: Cape Cod NS in Massachusetts and Cumberland Island NS in Georgia.
The report notes that the Cape Cod, Fire Island, Assateague Island, and Cape Hatteras national seashores already are experiencing rates of sea-level rise well above the global average.
Gulf Islands National Seashore can't handle another negative impact right now," says John Adornato, director of NPCA's Sun Coast regional office.
The quality of a National Park or National Seashore visit is increasingly overshadowed by statistics concerning the number of visitor-days each park or monument receives.
Oil exploration is under way within Padre Island National Seashore, bringing heavy truck traffic that park advocates worry will disrupt visitors and threaten the endangered Kemp's ridley sea turtle.
BNP intends to drill several more wells at the seashore.
He called export of few parts of oil by Makran seashores essential for Iran.
March 2000: The Park Service bans PWCs in 66 of the 87 parks but gives 21 seashores, lakeshores, and recreation areas two years to establish regulations for PWC use; any unit that wants to allow PWC use after the grace period must complete environmental assessments and make special rules.
NPS has banned PWC use in most national parks, but it exempted 21 parks, primarily seashores and lakeshores, from an immediate ban.
Ironically, it was LWCF funds that allowed for the establishment of national seashores in the park system.
As the other five national seashores that host nesting sea turtles each summer, the beaches at Canaveral are the eroding edge of barrier islands that have been rolling over onto themselves for millennia.
From Maine to South Carolina, vehicle restrictions to protect plovers at national seashores and other beaches are now common.