care

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CARE

(Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere), nonprofit, nonsectarian federation of agencies devoted to channeling relief and self-help materials to needy people in foreign countries. Organized in the United States (1945) to help war-ravaged Europe, CARE soon expanded its program to include developing nations in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Famous for its "CARE packages" of food and other necessities, CARE in now also involved in population, health care, land management, and small economic activity. It is now an international organization with 10 member countries and headquarters in Brussels.

care

  1. the work involved in supporting people who, because of physical frailty chronic illness or other forms of incapacity and disability, are incapable of leading an autonomous existence.
  2. other kinds of carework, e.g. in child-rearing (see CHILD CARE) and DOMESTIC LABOUR. This should be distinguished from care in sense 1.
Care in sense 1 operates over a wide range of social relations. A clear dividing line can be drawn between formal and informal care (see Abrams, 1978) as it exists in contemporary industrial societies. Formal care refers to services provided by agents of organization (statutory, voluntary and/or private) to people within clearly defined categories of need. Informal care is personally directed towards certain people who have a social relationship with their carer - usually a family member, and most often a spouse (Parker, 1993), or female relative.

Feminist sociologists (see also FEMINISM) have had a major impact on the understanding of care and caring relationships. They have argued that caring is ‘a gendered concept’ and that women constitute the majority of carers both informally, in the private sphere, and as low-paid care workers (‘care assistants’) in the formal sector (Finch and Groves, 1982; Ungerson, 1987; Lewis and Meredith, 1988). Studies of caring have examined the complex reasons why women care and the particular problems and difficulties they face. Social policies involving decarceration and COMMUNITY CARE, the decline of neighbour-hood and COMMUNITY associated with increasing SOCIAL (and geographical) MOBILITY, have placed an increasing burden on individual women carers. There is some evidence that women are reluctant to enter caring relationships with female relatives but lack viable alternatives (Cotterill, 1994). Recent research using data from the 1980 British General Household Survey has also pointed to the significant contribution made by male carers, particularly men who care for their wives (Arber and Gilbert, 1989).

care, custody, and control

Describes a standard exclusion in liability insurance policies. Under this exclusion, the liability insurance does not apply to damage to property in the care or custody of the insured, or to damage to property over which the insured is for any purpose exercising physical control.

CARE

agency devoted to channeling relief to needy people abroad. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 456]

care

in (or into) care Social welfare made the legal responsibility of a local authority by order of a court
References in periodicals archive ?
"Hopefully this service will improve patient outcomes but also have a significant impact on the amount of money being spent in secondary care."
Combined, it is hoped that the projects will lead to knowledge sharing about patients, allowing them to be managed in the community rather than secondary care, wherever possible.
The legislation will also bring with it important improvements to how secondary care services are provided and critical access to advocacy.
For any patient that requires further intervention through to secondary care, The service will need to work closely with local partner organisations to ensure that a swift, Coordinated pathway is followed and that all service users are transferred to the appropriate specialty.
Of the 141 patients who had visual fields repeated, only 38 patients (27%) were referred onto secondary care (Figure 2)--a deflection rate of 73%.
This service will provide signposting and direct referral to the following services:primary and secondary care for physical health needs.
Is there a significant variation in terms of rates of referral to secondary care and numbers advised to follow-up between different clinicians?
'About four years ago, the former Swansea Local Health Group decided to attempt to reduce some of the demand on secondary care by piloting the idea of setting up a GP with special interest service.
This would develop an intermediate level of wound care sitting between and overlapping primary and secondary care. "It should help reduce patients moving up into secondary care through early differential diagnosis and management of complex wounds.
improve the quality and appropriateness of gp referrals to secondary care develop greater opportunities for increased access of formal specialist care for patients.