secondary metabolite

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secondary metabolite

[′sek·ən‚der·ē mə′tab·ə‚līt]
(botany)
A natural chemical product of plants not normally involved in primary metabolic processes such as photosynthesis and cell respiration. Also known as secondary plant product.
References in periodicals archive ?
In-vitro studies reveal that these plant stem-cell extracts and their secondary metabolites minimize the damaging effects of sun exposure on collagen in human skin by reducing the generation of UV-induced inflammatory cytokines and free radicals, while also raising energy stores in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to boost cellular metabolism and increase collagen synthesis.
The percentage contents of primary and secondary metabolites in the leaves of T.
Thus the aim of this research was to evaluate the potential of secondary metabolites produced by Penicillium sp.
This paper deals with the isolation and structure elucidation of seven secondary metabolites isolated from the active fungus F.
Hypothesis: This study was designed systematically to explore Xylaria psidii, an endophytic fungus for the identification of biologically active secondary metabolites against pancreatic cancer cells.
Terpenoids and polyketides are the most purified antimicrobial secondary metabolites from endophytic, while flavonoids and lignans are rare [12].
Suppression of root diseases by Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0: importance of the bacterial secondary metabolite 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol.
Typical application areas for the BIOSTAT D-DCU include the process development and production of small-batch biopharmaceuticals, vaccines, enzymes, along with antibiotics and other secondary metabolites.
Typical fields of application include process development for the production of biopharmaceutics, vaccines, biofuels and secondary metabolites, the optimization of batch, fed-batch, continuous and perfusion processes as well as scale-up and scale-down experiments.
Due to the lack of motility and immune system plants have elaborated alternative defense strategies involving the huge variety of secondary metabolites as tools to overcome stress constraints thus adapt to the changing environment.
Although fouling organisms can be beneficial to their hosts, for example by offering camouflage and by providing protection from predators by their secondary metabolites (Laudien and Wahl, 1999), the interaction is largely considered harmful.

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