sedimentary rock

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sedimentary rock:

see rockrock,
aggregation of solid matter composed of one or more of the minerals forming the earth's crust. The scientific study of rocks is called petrology. Rocks are commonly divided, according to their origin, into three major classes—igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic.
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; sedimentsediment,
mineral or organic particles that are deposited by the action of wind, water, or glacial ice. These sediments can eventually form sedimentary rocks (see rock).
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sedimentary rock

[¦sed·ə¦men·trē ′räk]
(petrology)
A rock formed by consolidated sediment deposited in layers. Also known as derivative rock; neptunic rock, stratified rock.

sedimentary rock

Rock, such as limestone or sandstone, which is formed from materials deposited as sediments, in the sea or fresh water, or on the land. Also see stratified rock.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this condition, the coarse particles on the bed are easier to be entrained than the uniform sediment of equivalent sizes, because they have higher chance of exposure to the flow and experience larger fluid dynamic forces than they would if they were in a uniform sediment bed. The situation is reversed for the fine particles, in which transport of a particular size of smaller particles will be less than that if the bed were composed of uniform sediments of the same size.
This variability was at its greatest with the finer size fractions particularly when the sediment beds were water worked, with no upstream sediment supply rather than on mechanically scrapped flat beds [1].
This re-suspension could have been caused by increasing shear stress as the water was forced through narrow channels between the ice and the sediment bed (Macdonald et al., 1999), or by increased Mackenzie River flow from farther upstream, where breakup had already begun.
Variability in ambient sediment bed height was determined by identifying five high and five low locations along the transect line at the start of the experiment and identifying bed height changes over time.
Potential relationships between wind velocity, plot size, and changes in the sediment bed height were investigated by assessing changes in sediment bed height during the experiment.
But Izett says his value is corroborated by impact-shocked quartz grains found in sediment beds of the same age in South Dakota.