Seebeck coefficient


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Seebeck coefficient

[′zā‚bek ‚kō·i′fish·ənt]
(electronics)
The ratio of the open-circuit voltage to the temperature difference between the hot and cold junctions of a circuit exhibiting the Seebeck effect.
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References in periodicals archive ?
B] are the absolute Seebeck coefficient of each conductor, and [[alpha].
Typical thermocouples (TCs) are made from two different conductors, one with a large positive Seebeck coefficient and the other with a large negative coefficient-- for example, iron at +18.
The fabricated thermopiles typically have a resistance of 20 K[OMEGA] and showed a Seebeck coefficient of 7.
8 [micro]V/K) suggesting a weak Seebeck coefficient that typically shows a metallic behavior.
Thermal properties: Seebeck coefficient and electric resistance.
We have employed finite element analysis to develop computational Seebeck coefficient metrology simulations.
where S is the Seebeck coefficient for the material, T is the absolute temperature, p is the electrical resistivity of the material and k is the thermal conductivity of the material.
a]--the Seebeck coefficient defined as the 'thermoelectric power' of material (see Table 1); [T.
There are several important coefficients of the element that must be evaluated before creating the cooling module: the module's effective Seebeck coefficient ([[alpha].
2]/[rho][kappa], where [alpha] is the Seebeck coefficient, [rho] is the electrical resistivity, and [kappa] is the thermal conductivity, which includes the contributions from both carriers and phonons, i.
Note that the Seebeck coefficient is sometimes called the thermal EMF coefficient or thermoelectric power.